Archive for the ‘eat right’ Category

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How to Use Eat Cleaner – With Pictures!

May 9, 2011

We’ve had quite a few people ask us for a guide on how to use our Eat Cleaner products and while we have a ‘how-to’ on our website, we think this downloadable file posted on your fridge as a reference just might do the trick.

Download now.

Eat Cleaner How to Guide

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The 411 on Lunchbox Fun

November 1, 2010

Balance – that elusive apple pie in the sky.  Work, family, friends, exercise, phone calls, emails, soccer practice, walks with fido, drop-offs, pick-ups, party planning…it’s a precarious juggling act.  Now that school’s back in session, making it through the year in one piece will require you to keep your family healthy starting with what they put in their mouth. 

It clicked when I found out my Kindergartner get 10 minutes to eat and my grade schooler gets a whopping 20.  If they’re standing in line for 10 minutes waiting in the lunch line, they’re practically jamming food down their gullet and swallowing it whole.   If I don’t make every bit count, who will?  And did they get to even wash their hands before they eat?

The sad reality is childhood obesity has grown to epidemic proportions, literally and figuratively.  According to the Center for Disease Control, in the last 30 years, the prevalence of obesity has tripled. It’s not about being heavy.  It’s about the chronic disease that can takes years from their otherwise healthy lives – heart disease, liver disease, type 2 diabetes, depression, sleep apnea – this list goes on. 

It would be very easy to succumb to those non-descript, pre-packed wrapped lunch meals and neon-colored ‘phood’ snacks.  But you know better than to slap that super processed, phony baloney onto your kid’s buns. You’ve bought them school supplies.  Now get them food wise, starting with what’s for lunch. I mean, white bread and fluorescent snacks are so 1982. 

 

5 Reasons Why Packing a Lunch For You and Your Family Makes So Much Sense (Cents):

  1. It’s bound to be cheaper than what’s on the menu
  2. No waiting  in the lunch line, so they have time to chew
  3. You can clean your foods of bacteria, hormones and pesticide residue
  4. Peace of mind that their meal has been given the stamp of approval by you
  5. We hear packing a lunch is what the cool kids do

Save your wallets and waistlines by getting ahead of the yellow food bus with this 411 on lunchbox fun.  Check out our great main events and super sides grown up enough for you AND your kid’s that pack a nutritious punch and take you through the week.  Mama tested, kid approved.

Main Event

  • Roll on: Layer sliced chicken breast, lettuce or sprouts and chopped tomato onto a sprouted grain tortilla with a dab of stone ground mustard.  Roll and slice into pinwheel pieces.
  • Pita the Pocket:  Fill a sprouted grain pita with tuna salad seasoned with lite mayo and studded with celery and raisins.
  • Rasta Pasta Salad:  With a vegetable peeler, create long ribbons of carrot and zucchini.  Steam and add to brown rice pasta (let them pick their fave shape).  Season with a little grated cheese and butter and heat up in the morning before they head out the door.
  • Veggie Grilled Cheese: Cheddar, red bell pepper and steamed broccoli get cooked between two pieces of sprouted grain bread.  Grill in an oil-free pan and use a Panini press and seal it all in for one-handed eating ease.
  • Simple Sushi:  Sushi rolls are no longer a snooty snack.  Grab some Sea Snax olive oil toasted seaweed and roll up some vinegar-seasoned brown rice, avocado and cucumber hand rolls. 
  • The A+: Most classrooms are peanut free, so opt for almond butter and sliced apples onto a warm sprouted wheat tortilla and fold in half.  Give it a quick glow in the pan for a nice nutty flavor. An A+ in our book!

Super Star Sides

  • You don’t have to ‘sneak’ fruit and veggies into your meals anymore.  Earthbound Farm have made getting your delicious daily dose of F+V a snap with organically grown pre-cut produce.  Crisp apple slices from the sweetest apple varieties are harvested from premium organic orchards. Each 2oz bag equals about half an apple or one serving of fruitMini-Peeled Carrots & Carrot Dippers are an excellent source of vitamin A and other important antioxidant carotenoids, including beta carotene, alpha carotene, and lutein. Plus they’re great for your peepers.  Packaged with organic creamy ranch dip.  http://www.ebfarm.com/.

 

  • Most muffins, or what I like to call booty breakfast cake, pack a whopping 400+ calories!  All natural Vitalicious VitaTops give you all the flavor without in the kind of muffin top you can cuddle up to.  At just 100 calories and a gram and a half of fat each they’re a guilt-free choice for a delicious midday snack or a lunchtime dessert.  Plus they contain 9 grams of fiber 4 grams of protein. Because they don’t contain any preservatives, keep them frozen and by lunchtime your VitaTop is thawed and ready to eat.  Top that!  www.vitalicious.com.

 

  • Here’s the new skinny on crunchy snacks.  Pretzel Crisps are a tasty, thin, all-natural flat-baked pretzel and the world’s first spreadable pretzel cracker.  At only 110 calories per serving with no trans fats, saturated fat, or cholesterol, they’re packed with fiber and flavor that can handle the dip or stand alone on their own. Deli Style, available in the deli section of stores of course, and Modern Classic varieties.  Savory and sweet varieties include Sesame, Garlic Parmesan, Tuscan Three Cheese and Cinnamon Toast (yum, it’s like a churro but without the guilt).   Dig in.  www.pretzelcrisps.com.

 

  • The iconic moo cow just puts a smile on your face.  Horizon organic single serve milk comes in a variety of flavors – plain, chocolate, strawberry and vanilla – packed with calcium and protein to power through the day.  Cheese sticks in both Colby and Mozzarella flavors couldn’t be easier to pack. Horizon Organic believes that the choice for a healthy family and a healthy planet should be an easy one, offering nutritious products for families while supporting 500 family farmers across the U.S.  Raised without antibiotics or hormones, happy cows make happy humanshttp://www.horizondairy.com/.

 

  • Fruit is sprayed, waxed, trucked, touched and plucked by over 20 sets of hands.  A quick flash through the faucet just ain’t gonna’ cut it.  Eat Cleaner Fruit + Vegetables Wipes are a uniquely formulated to kill bacteria, clean wax, pesticides, agricultural dirt and fertilizer from the surface of your fruit to make it safer and healthier to eat.  Even fruit with a peel should be cleaned before you remove it.  Individually wrapped, slip one into your lunchbox and encourage the kids to clean their hands before they eat, since grimy hands can transmit bacteria.  www.eatcleaner.com.

5 more pennies for your thoughts: 

–         Make a list and buy it twice.  Take our tips, make your list and head to the store on the weekend and buy 2 weeks worth of supplies, twice a month so you’re stocked up.  Being prepared is half the sanity battle.

–         Have them do the work.  Get kids involved in shopping with you and making their own healthy lunches.  The connection to picking and making food builds a foundation for good eating habits and teaches them responsibility.  Have them make one for you while they’re at it.  It’ll save you $5-10 bucks a day which could go to your vacation fund or a non-profit you’ve been meaning to donate to.

–         The night before.  Prepare lunchboxes the night before and put them in an insulated lunch box to keep them cool longer. Add in an ice-pack if food is sitting for more than 3 hours. 

–         Chemical free is the way to be.  Always opt for BPA and thalate-free plastic storage containers.  Kid’s Konserve makes a great reusable water bottle and the Bento boxes at Pottery Barn make you want to pick one up for yourself!

–         Lunch love notes.  Slip them a caring, thoughtful note that lifts their spirits at lunchtime and let’s them know you care.  That little bit-o-love satiates a deeper appetite and will make them look forward to what’s in the bag.

You can get in front of the garbage food bus and protect your plates. When you take the wheel, you help chart their destiny and lead them down the right food lane.  Because you better believe, they’re like little sponges absorbing what you dish out.

 

 Mareya Ibrahim, Chief Executive Mom of EAT CLEANER, and the founder of The Cleaner Plate Club is a natural foods industry veteran and food safety education advocate based in Orange County, CA. http://www.eatcleaner.com

 
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Freshway Recall: Lettuce think before we bite

May 7, 2010

When will the madness end?  When people start taking food safety into their own hands.  It’s why we created Eat Cleaner in the first place.  Using the power of plant science, we give you a simple way to protect your family’s plate.  Restaurants, caterers and anyone serving food to others should also take heed.  The two minutes it takes to wash with Eat Cleaner can make a big difference in the lives you love.

Read these stories from members of S.T.O.P. (Safe Tables Our Priority) and learn why events like these should make us all think before we bite.

Washing with Eat Cleaner can help prevent your risk of E.coli infection.

By Lauren Bush and Valerie Threlkeld

Valerie

There is not a more helpless feeling than to have your healthy, beautiful 20-year-old daughter call you from 200 miles away and tell you something is physically wrong with her. It is a feeling I know all too well.

The symptoms my daughter described to me didn’t resemble anything that a young woman should encounter. Hospital personnel couldn’t seem to diagnose the problem – they were only able to rule things out. She then had to endure going from office to office to get records and test results while barely able to stand. When her dad brought her home, after racing 400 miles round trip, we took her to an urgent care center. The medical professionals there, too, sent her home with us.

The next day my daughter Lauren was directly admitted to the hospital. The horrifying battery of painful tests that followed was almost more than she could endure. Finally, after nearly having surgery to remove her colon, the news broke that there was an E. coli outbreak from baby spinach. Lauren recalled she had eaten a large baby spinach salad a few days before. She was tested for this particularly lethal strain of E. coli and it was confirmed. After spending a week in the hospital with strong IV antibiotics, she was discharged – 20 pounds lighter and very weak.

This was the most trying time our family has ever experienced. Lauren lost an entire semester of college, had to move back home, and experienced depression and other lingering physical changes from this horrifying illness. We continue to hope shewill not have long-term health impacts and will be able to enjoy good health.

This scenario should be in the minds of congressional lawmakers. My child is only one of thousands who have suffered due to shortfalls in the current food-safety system. Fortunately her story had a happy ending, but other families she has met while speaking in Washington have not been so lucky.

Lauren has traveled to Washington three times to speak about her experience. This is an easy subject to overlook until it affects you personally. The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (S.510) would make a difference to not only our family but to the many others who count on our government to do the right thing. Senators, please give me and mothers around the country the Mother’s Day gift we have been waiting far too long for – safer food.

Lauren

Despite growing up in a small town in rural Kentucky, I had big dreams in store for my future. I wanted to go to law school, live in New York City and change and conquer the world. I never imagined in planning to reach these goals that I should have left room to be sickened by food, be forced to leave college and almost die in the process.

Nevertheless, as I began my junior year of college at the University of Kentucky, I ate a spinach salad infected with hemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7. I was hospitalized for a total of two weeks and was in recovery for six months.

The first two years after my traumatic, sudden illness I felt very uncomfortable discussing what happened with anyone because foodborne illness is an ugly journey. There is blood, diarrhea, tears, and nausea, and pain — tremendous amounts of pain. Then last summer I was contacted by the New York Times for an article regarding food safety and came to realize that my voice could make a difference. It could save others from the same life-changing experience, or at least I thought it could.

I have now been to Washington, D.C., three times in the last year with Safe Tables Our Priority (S.T.O.P.) and the Make Our Food Safe coalition. I have met with my representatives, written letters, and told my story what feels like hundreds of times. Unfortunately, my voice can only travel so far. Until government officials in Washington realize the devastatingly negative impact that unsafe food can cause and move forward on passing the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (S. 510), we will all continue to be in danger.

There have been several large national outbreaks of contaminated food products since the spinach outbreak that made me sick. My only question is: What is Congress waiting for?

Go to http://actionnetwork.org/campaign/mothersletter and sign your name to a letter to Congress from moms just like you pushing action on food safety legislation.

This blogpost taken from:  http://www.momsrising.org/blog/food-safety-reform-cannot-wait-a-mother-daughters-story/

E. coli forces lettuce recall; 19 ill in 3 states

By Marie Clare Jalonick

WASHINGTON — A food company is recalling lettuce sold in 23 states and the District of Columbia because of an E. coli outbreak that has sickened at least 19 people, three of them with life-threatening symptoms.

The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday that 12 people had been hospitalized and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it was looking at 10 other cases probably linked to the outbreak.

Freshway Foods of Sidney, Ohio, said it was recalling romaine lettuce sold under the Freshway and Imperial Sysco brands because of a possible link to the E. coli outbreak.

College students at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Ohio State in Columbus and Daemen College in Amherst, N.Y., are among those affected, according to local health departments in those states.

The FDA is focusing its investigation on lettuce grown in Arizona as a possible source for the outbreak, according to two people who have been briefed by the agency. Donna Rosenbaum, director of the food safety advocacy group Safe Tables Our Priority and one of those briefed, said the agency held a phone call with public health advocates Thursday.

Rosenbaum and other public health advocates have long been pushing for stronger food safety laws. The House passed a bill last year that would give the agency much more authority to police food production, but the Senate has not acted on it.

The New York state Public Health Laboratory in Albany discovered the contamination in a bag of Freshway Foods shredded romaine lettuce on Wednesday after local authorities had been investigating the outbreak for several weeks. The bag of lettuce came from a processing facility that was also linked to the illnesses, the FDA said. The agency would not disclose the name of that facility or its location but said an investigation was under way.

E. coli infection can cause mild diarrhea or more severe complications, including kidney damage. The three patients with life-threatening symptoms were diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, which can cause bleeding in the brain or kidneys.

It was not immediately clear why students on college campuses were sickened. Freshway Foods said the lettuce was sold to wholesalers, food service outlets, in-store salad bars and delis.

Susan Cerniglia, spokeswoman for the public health department in Washtenaw County, where the University of Michigan is located, said it doesn’t appear that students who were sickened ate the contaminated food on campus. It is believed they may have been sickened at local restaurants, she said. Most of those sickened lived in Ann Arbor and not on campus.

The Erie County, N.Y., health department issued an alert late last month that linked at least one diagnosis of E. coli to a student who ate at a Daemen College dining facility. The alert said twelve students had been sickened after eating at the school and three students were hospitalized.

Kevin Montgomery of the Erie health department said Thursday that one case of E. coli was confirmed at Daemen College and another was suspected. All of the students have now recovered, he said.

The most common strain of E. coli found in U.S. patients is E. coli O157. The CDC said the strain linked to the lettuce, E. coli 0145, is more difficult to identify and may go unreported.

Freshway Foods said in a statement Thursday that the FDA informed the company about the positive test in New York on Wednesday afternoon. The statement said “an extensive FDA investigation” of Freshway Foods’ facility in Sidney has not uncovered any contamination at the plant.

The recalled lettuce has a “best if used by” date of May 12 or earlier. The recall also affects “grab and go” salads sold at Kroger, Giant Eagle, Ingles Markets and Marsh grocery stores.

The lettuce was sold in Alabama, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

This article taken from:  http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hEnc00D5YgQjLxbZqLLkjOw_fwzgD9FI0FRO1

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The Leaner in Cleaner

April 19, 2010

For us, diet is a 4-letter word. It conjures up visions of starvation, sacrifice and self-induced torture and ultimately, sabotage. When you have to find excuses to cheat no other than your own conscience, you know there’s something broken. If you’re a fan of word puzzles then you don’t need to look much further than our very own moniker to shedding unwanted pounds. 

Get Lean by Getting Cleaner. 

Our very own sales and marketing manager extraordinaire Ninfa is living proof. Just like a beautiful banana, she peeled off 15 pounds just by making a few small changes in her diet. Cleaner fruits and vegetables. Fewer chips and soda. Nutrient denser, Less processed foods. She looks great and feels more energetic and she’s getting her family on board. It’s a formula my 4 year-old can recite: Lots of fresh fruit and vegetables + lean protein and plenty of alkaline water = happy, healthy physiques. 

The ‘er’ in the everyday goes a long way to empowering yourself and everyone around you. Lean back, lean back. 

  


 Junk Food Confessions

When you’re about to say something you shouldn’t, you might bite your tongue. The fact is much or your ability to control your entire body lies in that little pink bundle of muscle. Your natural ability to sense sweet, sour, salty and bitter are there but sweet and salty are heightened by your sense of smell, making foods that fall into those categories that much more difficult to resist.   

Don’t despair. For every ‘vice’, there’s a delicious alternative that will satisfy your cravings and your wagging tongue’s need to feed. It may just require a little retraining for your tongue. Even kids have to try something new 8 times before they give them the boot.  

Here’s just a few of our EAT Cleaner solutions that deliver sounder nutrition with every guilt-free bite. Just don’t eat the whole bag.  

POTATO CHIPS
Homemade: Baked whole wheat spelt or pita chips with Chia or Flax seed or Kale brushed with olive oil and dusted with paprika.
Store bought: Annie Chun’s Seaweed strips – Try Wasabi flavored, they’re addictive OR Food Should Taste This Good chips – come in sweet potato and flax seed flavors.
 

 

SODA
Homemade: Sparkling or Ionized water with Fresh Cucumber slices and a squeeze of Lime or a light puree of fresh fruit.
Store bought: Izze Sparkling Juice – Clementine and Pomegranate flavors satisfy your sweet and fizzy cravings with no artificial flavors or sweeteners
 

 

FRENCH FRIES
Homemade French Bean Fries, Carrot Sticks and Zucchini Spears steamed, then lightly brushed with sesame oil and sesame seeds and then baked in the oven until crisp.
Store bought: Trader Joe’s Sweet Potato Fries baked in the oven and coated with fresh garlic and parsley
 

 

CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES
Homemade: Toasted spelt tortillas with almond butter and honey or oatmeal cookies filled with date. Get The Recipe
Store bought: Kashi Oatmeal Raisin Flax Cookies – try them heated for just a quick minute to soften them up – OR Larabar raw bars in Chocolate Coconut.
 

 

ICE CREAM
Homemade: Blend almond milk with your favorite Greek yogurt and a spoon of honey and a few spoonfuls of raw almonds. Freeze and eat.
Store Bought:Ciao Bella Gelato, made with real ingredients. Just a few bites should do the trick.
 


 


Get a SIGNED Copy of Anna’s EASY GREEN ORGANIC.

An ode to one of our favorite green holidays, we’re found this ANDI-friendly, nutrient dense kale patty that we’re sure you’ll flip for – whether you’re Irish or not. Pinch me, I’m in green heaven!  

 

We love Anna Getty for so many reasons. She’s an heiress, chef, and rock-steady chick with a sustainable vision who happens to be a great friend of Eat Cleaner. Her new book Easy Green Organic is a visual feast with real recipes that will become mainstays for your family.  

To call it a cookbook would not do it justice. Anna takes the concept further, explaining how to shop for organic, seasonal, and local ingredients; how to keep an eco-friendly kitchen; and how to cook meals that are as scrumptious to eat as they are healthful for the earth.  

Our favorites are the Quinoa Croquettes with Cilantro Yogurt Sauce for dipping and the Strawberry Arugula Salad. Sweets like Coconut Custard with Fresh Mango and Mint Chutney and Pear and Blueberry Crisp with Brown Sugar Sour Cream are just two of the functional favorites on our menu.  

Pick up a SPECIAL SIGNED copy of Easy Green Organic on our website HERE. A portion of the proceeds benefits the non-profit Healthy Child Healthy World.





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$1,500 in prizes from Eat Cleaner

March 24, 2010

Enter to win the next Eat Cleaner giveaway by becoming an FB fan @ Eat Cleaner.

We are thrilled to announce the 15 winners of our Womansday.com Sweepstakes for a $100 Eat Cleaner gift basket. 

And the winners are:

Jamie Cash Hemet  CA
Franca Stanco Glen Cove NY
Mandi Kuehn Morgan MN
Kathleen Giordano Milford CT
Jeannie Osborn Litchfield IL
Heddy Lettau Kaukauna WI
Kim Willis Eastpointe MI
Kelli Wilson Middleton ID
Sherwin Figuracion San Jose CA
Barbara Boyd Cambridge City IN
Terri Morrow Monroeville PA
Odette Ferrari Brownsville TX
Toni Murnan Shelbyville IN
Richard Hicks Winston Salem NC
Karen Nye Fombell PA

If you’d like to enter to win another fab gift basket, join our FB fan page @eat cleaner and sign up for our weekly newsletter @www.eatcleaner.com to learn more about our new promotions.

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Who’s Been Playing With Your Melons?

March 5, 2010

These melons have gotten around.

Not to get personal, but chew on this…most food has not only traveled thousands of miles, it’s been touched by dozens of hands that have been who knows where. You can bet that those melons of yours have made the rounds. Squeezed, sneezed on, prodded, dropped and even bitten into before they come home with you. What you need to protect yourself from isn’t always visible to the naked eye.

So before you bite, practice safe snax.

In January, there were several recalls of watermelon and cantaloupe linked to Salmonella. This pathogen can wreak havoc on your health, especially infants and children, the elderly and people with autoimmune deficiencies. What you may not know is that usually Salmonella is transferred from the rind to the inside of the fruit. So if you clean the outside thoroughly, you can enjoy those melons safely.  The same goes for oranges, grapefruit, bananas – really, anything with a peel deserves at least a good Eat Cleaner wipe.  A small, preventative step can make a big difference in the health of what you serve yourself and your family. 


The Cleaner Plate Club

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Protection of Food Supply Faces Problems

February 12, 2010

HOT PLATE UPDATE

By Bill Whitaker

(CBS)  When it comes to agriculture, America is indeed the land of plenty. Foods raised here and imported from around the world provide greater abundance and choice than ever before. But while our foods are bountiful, they’re also inconsistently regulated.

The U.S. has one of the safest food supplies in the world, but the report card is mixed, reports CBS News Correspondent Bill Whitaker. Every year 33 percent of Canadians get sick from what they eat. In the U.S., it’s 25 percent. But in England it’s only 2 percent and in France just 1 percent. In both places food is grown more locally and on a smaller scale than in North America.
For part of the CBS News series “Where America Stands,” a recent poll found that just one in three Americans are very confident that the food they buy is safe although the vast majority are at least somewhat confident that their food is safe.

Special Report: “Where America Stands”

Safety always comes first in 12-year-old Rylee Gustafson’s kitchen.
“I need to wash my hands … I touched my jeans,” Gustafson said in her Henderson, Nev., home recently. She, more than anyone, knows that even good food can hurt you. In 2006, on her 9th birthday, she ate a spinach salad and was infected with a virulent strain of e-coli.
“It felt like killer pain, and my organs started to shut down,” Gustafson told Whitaker.
Kathleen Chrismer, Rylee’s mother, told Whitaker that she panicked when she didn’t know what was hurting her daughter.
“You really didn’t think you were going to pull through?” Whitaker asked Gustafson.
“I really felt that bad,” she said.
She spent 35 days in the hospital on dialysis. Today she’s still wary of fresh fruits and vegetables and has a damaged heart, kidney and vocal chords.

The Problem
Her story is just one example of the problem of food safety. Over the last few years, widespread outbreaks in spinach, tomatoes, peppers and peanut products sickened thousands and killed nearly a dozen Americans. Every year there are 76 million cases of foodborne illness in the United States, resulting in 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths.

Today Americans consume more fresh produce, increasingly from imports from around the world. But imported produce is inspected even less than home-grown harvests. “Ninety-nine percent of the food that you’re buying at the grocery store that comes from foreign coutnries has not been inspected by the FDA,” said Erik Olson, director of food and consumer product safety at the Pew Charitable Trusts.  Olson says the Food and Drug Administration is simply not up to the task. The FDA is responsible for 80 percent of the food supply, which is everything but meat and poultry.

The number of food producers under FDA jurisdiction has increased, but the number of inspections is going down. Between 2001 and 2007, the number of domestic food producers increased from 51,000 to 65,500. At the same time, the number of producers inspected fell from 14,721 to 14,566, according to the Government Accountability Office.  “They simply do not have the tools to really protect our food supply,” Olson told Whitaker. 

Gustafson traveled to Washington to share her story with members of Congress. She’ll probably need a kidney transplant when she’s a teenager. Until then, she just wants to see this bill pass.  “I would love to see that so people don’t have to take the risk,” Gustafson told Whitaker. “They know that it’s probably not gonna have a bacteria that’s gonna kill you or your child.”  Having safe food, she says, is not too much to ask.

This article may be found in full at:  http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/01/09/eveningnews/main6076565.shtml?tag=contentMain;contentBody

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