Archive for the ‘pesticides’ Category

h1

Where can you find Eat Cleaner?

May 29, 2010
California
 
Ralph’s
Stater Bros
Jimbo’s Naturally
Irvine Ranch Market
Farm Fresh to You
The Pump Station
Milkalicious
PC Greens
Erewhon
Vicente Foods
Full O’ Life
Coast Produce
Major Markets
Wholesome Choice
Pacific Ranch Market  
Farmers Market at Marbella Plaza
Farm to Market
7-Eleven (Select Stores)
 
Washington State
Lemongrass
 
 
East Coast
 
Wegman’s
Wellnest
 
Texas
 
Whole Foods Texas (20 stores)
 
 
Online
 
www.QVC.com
www.Greenthology.com
www.Alice.com
www.Amazon.com
www.Theecoluxelife.com
www.Shft.com
www.Worldofgreen.com
www.Eatcleaner.com
 
 Soon to come:
Vitamin Shoppe
Advertisements
h1

Raising PAM | iParenting Award | Pesky Pesticides

May 20, 2010

 

 

 

Being a mom is no joke. We carry, quite literally, on our hips the responsibility of bringing baby into the world. And there you are, leaving the hospital wondering…Um…Where’s the owner’s manual? Nursing, feeding, clothing, nurturing, soothing, incessant worrying and the frenetic, hair pulling task of making all the right choices to raise Jane to be a prodigious, healthy, happy, socially responsible person can leave you wondering if you really had the credentials for the job in the first place.    

 

This month, we set sail on a journey with Anna Getty’s Pregnancy Awareness Month (PAM), where moms-to-be got the 411 on a kinder, greener way to get started on the right foot – starting with mom’s health. Eco-celebs Mariel Hemingway, Ricki Lake and Josie Maran with experts Dr. Alan Greene, Kim Barnouin (HealthyBitchDaily), Gigi Chang (Plum Organics), Lisa Druxman (Stroller Strides Founder) and Christopher Gavigan (CEO Healthy Child Healthy World) provided invaluable information and insight into health and wellness. Eat Cleaner was there proudly alongside to show how you can take food safety into your own hands, because a diet filled with fresh, clean food for all moms is key. We’re honored to be part of the PAM community that is nurturing knowledge, support and celebrating the wonder of being a green mother. With friends like these, it’s not so scary after all.
Check out http://www.pregnancyawarenessmonth.com/ for info and tune into today’s Twitter party.



HOT PLATE! Eat Cleaner is the 2010 winner of the Disney iParenting Excellent Products Award! We got top honors in the Safety category for best new products.

CLICK HERE for the full scoop.



 



 

 

Make Eat Cleaner Your Business and Earn Real Green.

Promote Eat Cleaner products at your local farmer’s market, green events, festivals and to friends, family and neighbors with our easy start-up business kit. Part time and full time opportunities. Plant the seeds of your own success and reap the rewards faster than you can say ‘arugula.’

IMMEDIATE AVAILABILITY NATIONWIDE. To learn more, CLICK HERE or email us at info@eatcleaner.com with ‘MAKE EAT CLEANER MY BUSINESS’ in the subject line.

AFFILIATE PROGRAM

Want to earn cash in your sleep? Become an Eat Cleaner affiliate. It’s sooo easy. Just sign up, post one of our banner ads on your blog or website and make 25% of every sale that comes through to us. No cost to you. You’ll be counting $$$$ with your ZZZZ’s.

CLICK HERE to sign up.

 


 

Pesticide Panic

The latest research linking ADHD with a group of pesticides called organophosphates ripped through the news this week, setting off panic attack with fruit and veggie eaters everywhere. The real peril here is that people will peel back their intake of produce. Fact is there are ways to reduce toxins in your food, and healthy living expert Jordan Rubin spoke about why you would use our products on CNN. Here’s how to eat cleaner everyday:  

CLICK HERE to Watch Video

Give ‘em a real cleaning: We don’t have to tell you the importance of washing your food, but studies show you can eliminate much of the pesticide residue if you wash the surface thoroughly. Neither wax nor most pesticides are water soluble, so Eat Cleaner wash and wipes help to dissolve these barriers and get under the surface.

Wash frozen fruit + veggies: Studies showed that frozen fruit and vegetables showed a higher rate of pesticides, as consumers don’t generally think about washing them. Make sure to wash them or buy fresh, clean thoroughly, then show them to the freezer.

Organic produce still needs to be cleaned: Overspray and pesticide drift can still contaminate organic produce. Wash with Eat Cleaner to help get them as nature intended and give them a longer life.

Rinds and peels need a wash: Pesticide residue can contaminate the flesh if you don’t give them a good wash. Make sure to clean melons, oranges, grapefruit and other produce on the outside.

Pick from the Clean 15 instead of the Dirty Dozen: The Environmental Working Group created this list of the most and least sprayed fruits and vegetables. Make the ‘right ones’ your new friends and go organic and a good scrub with the ones on the left.

For the complete story linking ADHD to pesticide intake in children, CLICK HERE.

ENTER TO WIN one of 3 Eat Cleaner gift packs valued at $50 each from our friends at Garden of Life on Facebook. Click here to learn more.



Big Fruity Deal
The Eat Cleaner bunch is growing and we’re proud to announce our newest homes at Whole Foods in Texas and Stater Bros in California. Look for us in the produce aisles and on the meat counters and support our retailer partners who are helping families take food safety into their own hands. We are forever grateful.

California
Stater Bros (all stores)
Irvine Ranch Market
Farm Fresh to You
The Pump Station
Milkalicious
PC Greens
Erewhon
Vicente Foods
Full O’ Life
Coast Produce
Major Markets (Fallbrook, Escondido, CA)
Wholesome Choice (CA)
Pacific Ranch Market
Farmers Market at Marbella Plaza
Farm to Market
7-Eleven (Costa Mesa)

Washington State
Lemongrass

East Coast
Wegmans (most stores)
Wellnest

Texas
Whole Foods – Texas (20 stores)

Online
QVC.com
Greenthology.com
Alice.com
Amazon.com
Theecoluxelife.com
Shft.com
Worldofgreen.com



 


JOIN :: WATCH :: FOLLOW :: LEARN

 


 

Talk to Us
Have a story about how Eat Cleaner has worked for you? 
Email us at info@eatcleaner.com and you’ll receive
a set of 2 reusable Eat Cleaner Produce Bags.
You can be our featured testimonial on our home page.

 

 

 

 
 
 
h1

New Study Shows Direct Link Between ADHD and Pesticides

May 17, 2010

Study: ADHD linked to pesticide exposure

By Sarah Klein, Health.com
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Kids with above-average levels of a common pesticide byproduct had twice ADHD risk
  • Direct cause-and-effect link “really hard to establish,” expert says
  • Study is first to examine the effects of pesticide exposure in population at large

Is enough being done to protect us from chemicals that could harm us? Watch “Toxic America,” a special two-night investigative report with Sanjay Gupta M.D., June 2 & 3 at 8 p.m. ET on CNN.

(Health.com) — Children exposed to higher levels of a type of pesticide found in trace amounts on commercially grown fruit and vegetables are more likely to have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder than children with less exposure, a nationwide study suggests.

Researchers measured the levels of pesticide byproducts in the urine of 1,139 children from across the United States. Children with above-average levels of one common byproduct had roughly twice the odds of getting a diagnosis of ADHD, according to the study, which appears in the journal Pediatrics.

Exposure to the pesticides, known as organophosphates, has been linked to behavioral and cognitive problems in children in the past, but previous studies have focused on communities of farm workers and other high-risk populations. This study is the first to examine the effects of exposure in the population at large.

Organophosphates are “designed” to have toxic effects on the nervous system, says the lead author of the study, Maryse Bouchard, Ph.D., a researcher in the department of environmental and occupational health at the University of Montreal. “That’s how they kill pests.”

The pesticides act on a set of brain chemicals closely related to those involved in ADHD, Bouchard explains, “so it seems plausible that exposure to organophosphates could be associated with ADHD-like symptoms.”

Health.com: Seven stars with ADHD

Environmental Protection Agency regulations have eliminated most residential uses for the pesticides (including lawn care and termite extermination), so the largest source of exposure for children is believed to be food, especially commercially grown produce. Adults are exposed to the pesticides as well, but young children appear to be especially sensitive to them, the researchers say.

Detectable levels of pesticides are present in a large number of fruits and vegetables sold in the U.S., according to a 2008 report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture cited in the study. In a representative sample of produce tested by the agency, 28 percent of frozen blueberries, 20 percent of celery, and 25 percent of strawberries contained traces of one type of organophosphate. Other types of organophosphates were found in 27 percent of green beans, 17 percent of peaches, and 8 percent of broccoli.

Although kids should not stop eating fruits and vegetables, buying organic or local produce whenever possible is a good idea, says Bouchard.

Health.com: 5 reasons you can’t concentrate

“Organic fruits and vegetables contain much less pesticides, so I would certainly advise getting those for children,” she says. “National surveys have also shown that fruits and vegetables from farmers’ markets contain less pesticides even if they’re not organic. If you can buy local and from farmers’ markets, that’s a good way to go.”

A direct cause-and-effect link between pesticides and ADHD “is really hard to establish,” says Dana Boyd Barr, Ph.D., a professor of environmental and occupational health at Emory University. However, she says, “There appears to be some relation between organophosphate pesticide exposure and the development of ADHD.”

This is the largest study of its kind to date, according to Barr, who researched pesticides for more than 20 years in her previous job with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention but was not involved in the study.

Bouchard and her colleagues analyzed urine samples from children ages 8 to 15. The samples were collected during an annual, nationwide survey conducted by the CDC, known as the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Health.com: Do you have adult ADHD?

The researchers tested the samples for six chemical byproducts (known as metabolites) that result when the body breaks down more than 28 different pesticides. Nearly 95 percent of the children had at least one byproduct detected in their urine.

Just over 10 percent of the children in the study were diagnosed with ADHD. The kids were judged to have ADHD if their symptoms (as reported by parents) met established criteria for the disorder, or if they had taken ADHD medication regularly in the previous year.

Health.com: The link between drugs, alcohol and ADHD

One group of pesticide byproducts was associated with a substantially increased risk of ADHD. Compared with kids who had the lowest levels, the kids whose levels were 10 times higher were 55 percent more likely to have ADHD. (Another group of byproducts did not appear to be linked to the disorder.)

In addition, children with higher-than-average levels of the most commonly detected byproduct — found in roughly 6 in 10 kids — were nearly twice as likely to have ADHD.

“It’s not a small effect,” says Bouchard. “This is 100 percent more risk.”

To isolate the effect of the pesticide exposure on ADHD symptoms, the researchers controlled for a variety of health and demographic factors that could have skewed the results.

Still, the study had some limitations and is not definitive, Bouchard says. Most notably, she and her colleagues measured only one urine sample for each child, and therefore weren’t able to track whether the levels of pesticide byproducts were constant, or whether the association between exposure and ADHD changed over time.

Health.com: What if my child begins showing ADHD symptoms?

Long-term studies including multiple urine samples from the same children are needed, Bouchard says. She suspects such studies would show an even stronger link between pesticide byproducts and ADHD.

EPA spokesman Dale Kemery said in a statement that the agency routinely reviews the safety of all pesticides, including organophosphates. “We are currently developing a framework to incorporate data from studies similar to this one into our risk assessment,” Kemery said. “We will look at this study and use the framework to decide how it fits into our overall risk assessment.”

Kemery recommended that parents try other pest-control tactics before resorting to pesticide use in the home or garden. Washing and peeling fruits and vegetables and eating “a varied diet” will also help reduce potential exposure to pesticides, he said.

“I would hope that this study raises awareness as to the risk associated with pesticide exposure,” Bouchard says. “There’s really only a handful of studies on this subject out there, so there’s room for more awareness.”

h1

Think before you bite

March 21, 2009

Eat Cleaner The all Natural Fruit,Vegetable,Seafood and Poultry wash and spray

What happens to our food supply between the field and the fork? Most food has not only traveled thousands of miles, it’s been touched by dozens of hands and doused with who-knows-what, leaving the cleanliness of our meals questionable.
Why use EAT CLEANER™? Because rinsing with water alone is not enough to ensure your produce is as safe for your family’s food supply as it should be. Pesticides, waxes, organic residues and surface contaminants can wreak havoc on your health. Here’s the facts in a nutshell:
SOILS AND DIRT RESIDUE – According to the CDC, fresh manure used to fertilize vegetables can also contaminate them, as is practiced with organically grown foods. Animal feces are the source of many of today’s life-threatening foodborne illnesses, particularly E.coli. Because organic standards support the recycling of animal feces as a method of improving soil fertility in croplands, fecal residue on organically grown produce requires attention. EAT CLEANER™? thoroughly removes the soils and dirt residues that can carry these harmful pathogens. Even fruit with peels should be thoroughly cleaned, since those same fingers that touched the skin will be co-mingling with the inner flesh. Imagine getting your own crevices squeaky clean without a nice sudsy shower.
SURFACE CONTAMINANTS: Before your produce gets into your own two hands, it’s traveled an average of 1,500 miles and touched about 20 other people’s grimy mitts. If you eat a lot of fruits and vegetables, but always peel them first, you may be missing out on a source of fibre and other nutrients. Not only are most fruit and vegetable peels good for you, their bright colours add pizzazz to your meal. Playing it safe and washing thoroughly helps remove any unwanted residue. Even triple-washed bagged salad can be a pathogen playground, so giving them a good spray, soak and spin with the EAT CLEANER™? ‘3-S’ System is the clean way to go.
PESTICIDES: Data from the USDA’s Pesticide Data Program (PDP) show 90 percent or more of conventionally produced apples, peaches, pears and strawberries have pesticide residues. Substances such as Azinphos methyl, a dangerous neurotoxin banned in Europe , commonly found on apples. There is growing scientific consensus that even very small doses of pesticides can adversely affect people, especially during the vulnerable periods of in utero and early childhood development when organ systems are maturing most quickly, when toxic defenses are least established, and when early programming of risks for chronic disease later in life takes place. Exposure to pesticides is linked to chronic diseases including Parkinson’s Disease, child and adult cancers and neurodevelopmental. The bottom line is many pesticides are water-resistant to help withstand the elements, so rinsing them under water just won’t get the job done.
WAXES: Edible wax is applied to trap moisture and keep produce fresh longer, but dirt and pesticide residues can get trapped underneath. Studies have found that American consumers are exposed to toxic chemicals known as persistent organic pollutants as many as 70 times a day. POP exposure has been associated with immune system suppression, nervous and hormonal system disorders, reproductive system damage, and various cancers, including breast cancer. I don’t know about you but I’d rather pass on the paraffin. Snacking on candle wax is overrated.
%d bloggers like this: