Posts Tagged ‘fruit’

h1

TOTAL RECALL: Think before you bite 5/13

May 13, 2011

 

 Salmonella in More Tomato Products

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – May 7, 2011 – Mann Packing is voluntarily recalling certain vegetable platters and Snacks on the Go product because the grape tomato ingredient may be contaminated with Salmonella. As of today this recall has expanded to include Safeway’s Eating Right Veggie Party Platter with “best if used by dates” and in stores specified below.

This recall is part of a larger recall initiated by Six L’s Packing (Immokalee, Fla) on April 29, 2011. Six L’s is recalling a single lot of grape tomatoes packed on April 11, 2011 that can be identified by Cherry Berry lot code DW-H.

The contamination was detected through a random sample obtained by the USDA at a distributor in New York. The tomatoes were grown at a farm in Estero, Fla. which has since ceased production. The strain of Salmonella has not been determined and no illnesses have been reported.

This nationwide, voluntary recall, by Mann Packing includes the following items with best if used by dates ranging from 05-09 to 05-16 2011.

• Safeway’s Eating Right Veggie Party Platter (universal product code 79893-10708, weight 3 pounds, 6 ounces) sold at Carrs, Dominick’s, Genuardi’s, Pavilions, Randall’s, Safeway, Tom Thumb, and Vons.
• Mann’s Veggies On the Go (universal product code 16519 01411-6, weight 1 pound, 2 ounces).
• Mann’s Snacks on the Go with Celery, Carrots, Tomatoes (universal product code16519 01501-4, weight 8.75 ounces).
• Mann’s Vegetable Platter Large (universal product code 16519 01407-9, 2 pounds, 8 ounces).

The voluntary recall does not include any other products packed or distributed by Mann Packing.

Salmonella is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy people may experience fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea (which may be bloody), and abdominal pain. In rare cases the organism can get into the bloodstream and cause more serious complications (for more information visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s website at www.cdc.gov).

Mann Packing is working with its customers to remove the subject products from distribution. The appropriate regulatory agency has been notified.

Retailers have been contacted and asked to identify, segregate and hold all products matching the information included in this notice.

Consumers who purchased the specific items mentioned above are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Customers and consumers with questions may contact Mann Packing at 1-800-285-1002 or via info@veggiesmadeeasy.com.

This recall taken from: http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm254904.htm

Consumers Warned to Avoid Eating Oysters rom Area 1642  in Apalachicola Bay, Florida

 

Warning follows bacterial illness outbreak

Fast Facts
• The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is advising consumers, restaurant operators, commercial shippers and processors of shellfish not to eat, serve, purchase, sell or ship oysters from Area 1642 in Apalachicola Bay, Fla. because the oysters may be contaminated with toxigenic Vibrio cholerae serogroup O75.

• Nine persons have been reported with illness. For eight, the illness was confirmed as caused by toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O75; laboratory confirmation is pending in the other person. No one was hospitalized or died.

• All ill persons reported consumption of raw or lightly steamed oysters.

• Traceback indicates that oysters harvested from Area 1642 in Apalachicola Bay, Fla., between March 21 and April 6, 2011, are associated with illness. 

• Those who have recently purchased oysters should check with the place of purchase and ask if they were harvested from the affected growing area.

What is the problem?
Raw oysters harvested from Area 1642 in Apalachicola Bay, Fla. between March 21 and April 6, 2011, have been linked to eight confirmed and one possible case of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O75 infection. The ill persons ate raw or lightly cooked oysters harvested from that area. Ill persons reside in Florida, Georgia, Louisiana and Indiana; all report consumption of oysters while in Florida.  There are several designated harvest areas within Apalachicola Bay, Fla, and each of these has a unique numerical identifier. Area 1642 is a zone that stretches from north to south in Apalachicola Bay just on the east side of the bridge that goes from Eastpoint, Fla., to St. George Island, Fla. The zone is approximately two miles wide from east to west.

This warning taken from:  http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm254754.htm

Donuts Recalled

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – May 10, 2011 – Bimbo Bakeries USA, Inc. is recalling the following Entenmann’s brand bagged Pop’Ems donuts and Bimbo brand 8 pack Donitas donuts sold in the following states because they may develop an uncharacteristic smell and become moldy within the product code:

Entenmann’s

Product Names
Sizes
States
UPC Codes
Powdered Pop’Ems Donuts 10 oz./284 grams AZ, CA, NV, UT 72030 01570
Cinnamon Pop’Ems Donuts 10 oz./284 grams AZ, CA, NV, UT 72030 01985
Rich Frosted Pop’Ems Donuts 10.5 oz./298 grams AZ, CA, NV, UT 72030 01571

Bimbo

Product Names
Sizes
States
UPC Codes
Sugared Donitas Donuts 8 count – 3.6 oz./102 grams AZ, CA, ID, NV, UT, WY 74323 07039
Powdered Donitas Donuts 8 count – 4.0 oz./113 grams AZ, CA, ID, NV, UT, WY 74323 04976
Chocolate Frosted Donitas Donuts 8 count – 4.3 oz./122 grams AZ, CA, ID, NV, UT, WY 74323 09964

The products were manufactured in the same facility.

The Entenmann’s products being recalled are in blue and white bags with the following dates which are printed on the top front of the bags:

  May 11, 12, 15, 18, 19, 22, 25, 26, 29, 2011
  June 1, 2, 6, 2011 

The Bimbo products being recalled are in cellophane wrappers with the same dates which are printed in a circle in the upper right of the package.

The company announced the recall after it received complaints of the unpleasant odor and temporary illness.  While the potential for serious health problems is low, some consumers are sensitive to the uncharacteristic off-smell and should not eat the recalled products because of possible temporary gastro-intestinal distress, including nausea and diarrhea. 

All products with the above code dates are being removed from store shelves in the affected states.  No other Entenmanns’s or Bimbo products or other states are affected.

Consumers who have purchased the product can return the product to its place of purchase for a full refund.  Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-800-984-0989 at any time 24 hours a day.

This recall taken from: http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm255026.htm

Salmonella in Paprika (Canada)

 

OTTAWA, May 11, 2011 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Alimentarus Import Export Inc. are warning the public and retailers not to sell, use or consume the Piment doux moulu (mild ground paprika) described below because the product may be contaminated with Salmonella.

The affected product, Dar Al Assala brand Piment doux moulu (mild ground paprika), imported from Morocco, was sold to various retail stores in Quebec as 5 kg bags bearing UPC 6 111242 541054, lot code PD17-F278 and best before date 05/10/2012.

This product is also known to have been sold from bulk. If you have purchased bulk paprika on or after November 12, 2010, and are unsure if you have the recalled product, check with your place of purchase to verify if it is subject to the recall.

This product is known to have been distributed in Quebec.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product.

Food contaminated with Salmonella may not look or smell spoiled.  Consumption of food contaminated with these bacteria may cause salmonellosis, a foodborne illness.  In young children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems, salmonellosis may cause serious and sometimes deadly infections.  In otherwise healthy people, salmonellosis may cause short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, vomiting, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhoea.  Long-term complications may include severe arthritis.

The importer, Alimentaurus Import Export Inc. located in Montreal, QC is voluntarily recalling the affected products from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

For more information, consumers and industry can call CFIA at 1-800-442-2342 / TTY 1-800-465-7735 (8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday to Friday).

This recall taken from: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2011/20110511e.shtml

Listeria in Pork Loin (Canada)

 

OTTAWA, May 12, 2011 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is warning the public not to consume the Fumagalli brand Pronta Fresca Lonza Stagionata (Seasoned Dry Cured Pork Loin) described below because the product may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

The affected product, Fumagalli brand Pronta Fresca Lonza Stagionata (Seasoned Dry Cured Pork Loin), imported from Italy, is sold in 100 g packages bearing UPC 8 002469 571352, Batch 119066 and Best Before 05/07/2011.

This product has been distributed in Quebec.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product.

Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with this bacteria may cause listeriosis, a foodborne illness. Listeriosis can cause high fever, severe headache, neck stiffness and nausea. Pregnant women, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems are particularly at risk. Infected pregnant women may experience only a mild, flu-like illness, however, infections during pregnancy can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn, or even stillbirth.

The Importer, Les Aliments Edesia Inc. located in Saint-Hubert, QC is voluntarily recalling the affected product from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

For more information, consumers and industry can call CFIA at 1-800-442-2342 / TTY 1-800-465-7735 (8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday to Friday).

This recall taken from: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2011/20110512be.shtml

Hepatitis A Outbreak in Snoqualmie Valley CA

 

SEATTLE–An outbreak of Hepatitis A in the Snoqualmie Valley has county health authorities asking people to get vaccinated.  Matias Valenzuela, public education coordinator with the county’s public health department, said his office has responded to six confirmed cases in the Valley, all in adults.  No word yet on the source of the outbreak. 

Hepatitis A is the only common vaccine-preventable foodborne disease in the United States (Fiore, 2004). It is one of five human hepatitis viruses that primarily infect the human liver and cause human illness. Unlike hepatitis B and C, hepatitis A doesn’t develop into chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis, which are both potentially fatal conditions; however, infection with the hepatitis A virus (HAV) can still lead to acute liver failure and death.

This article taken from: http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/snoqualmie-valley-hepatitis-a-outbreak/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+FoodPoisonBlog+%28Food+Poison+Blog%29

 STOP in the News: China Imports in the Grocery Store – A Cause for Concern

 

**STOP President Nancy Donley Quoted Below**

  

With Chinese products dominating more than just the shelves of dollar stores, it shouldn’t come as that much of a surprise — if you’re surprised at all — that imports from the largest nation in the world are increasingly finding their way into American grocery stores.

But the Chinese imports are starting to crop up in parts of the store that were more typically dominated by U.S. grown products or those from Central America. One such place is the freezer case, where imports are up 20 percent over the past decade and it is no longer unusual to find frozen vegetables that originated in China.

Even so, China still accounts for only seven percent of the overall market of frozen fruits and vegetable — up from two percent in 1999, notes Corey Henry, vice president of the American Frozen Food Institute,

“So, yes, imports from China have grown quite a bit, but still represent a small segment of the overall fruit and vegetable market,” Henry says. “China is the fourth largest foreign supplier of fruit and vegetables with Mexico, Canada and Chile the top three.”

But, if you shift away from frozen and fresh fruits and vegetables, where influence is growing but not yet commanding, you need not stray too far to see domination.

“I am concerned with just what regulatory program they have over there for food,” says Nancy Donley, president of STOP Foodborne Illness, a safe food advocacy group. “China has just always been one that raises concerns for us.”

Donley said the country has just said too many times that it is cleaning up its act: “‘We promise to never do it again until the next time’.”

The complete article can be viewed here:  http://blogs.reuters.com/prism-money/2011/05/11/china-imports-in-the-grocery-store-a-cause-for-concern/

Advertisements
h1

Waste not, save more: How to make every bite count

April 21, 2011

Rachel Zoe on Waste...at least that's what we think she'd say

 Waste not, save more. 

With the escalating prices of everyday life and a belt-tightening economy, everyone is more mindful of where their green is going. Yet, if you were to peek into your local landfill, you’d find almost 40% of it from fresh food – a waste of precious resources and a weight on the environment. 25% of our water and 4% of oil go into food that ends up in the trash, and it costs the U.S. $1B (with a B) dollars a year just to deal with disposal. To add to the pile, methane gas from food waste is 21x more harmful to the environment than car emissions.*

Give your fruit + veggies a wash before they chill.  We know, you’ve been trained to wait until you’re ready to use it.  But that’s because they’re talking about using water.  You, my friend, know better. Eat Cleaner Fruit + Vegetable Wash extends your shelf life and helps make your fruit and veggies ‘fast food’ because they’re ready to eat in a flash.  Clean it, dry it and store it.

 

Break bread with friends and family.  Nothing like gathering people you love around the table or sharing food with someone.  It not only brings you closer together, it helps avoid waste.  Swap nights where one cooks and the other cleans up and bring a little extra to work to share with your cohorts.  It’s amazing what a little food can do to break the ice, too!

Give it back to the earth. Collect that organic goodness and complete the life cycle.  Compost is one of the best way to feed your garden, flowers and herbs.   Most local waste management companies will even provide one to you at little or no cost.  For more info on becoming a safer, cleaner composter, click here for a how-to primer.

*Source:  Dept. of Agriculture, Science NOW.

How can you make every bite more earth wise?  Try these 6 on for size.

Avoid Take Out. According to cleanair.org, the US population tosses out paper bags & plastic cups, forks & spoons every year to circle the equator 300 times! That $.99 burrito may seem cheaper and more convenient in the short run but all that packaging – disposable trays, bags, cups and cutlery – has to go somewhere!

Make a list, shop for it once. Gas has gone through the roof! If you make a list, shop for your ingredients once, and plan your meals for the week, you can maximize your resources and time. Store them in reusable containers and take them to work and have plenty ready for the kids’ lunchboxes. Getting organized will save you time and after all, who has time to waste?

Shop seasonally. The further food has to travel, the longer the carbon footprint behind it. When it comes to fresh fruit and veggies, check to see if they’ve trekked around the globe before you buy them. The NRDC’s Simple Steps website is a good resource to find fresh produce in season depending on where you live and the time of year.

Meat-less. It’s estimated 1,800 to 2,500 gallons of water go into a single pound of beef compared to about 200 pounds of tofu. Cutting down on meat consumption just once a week can also reduce your risk of heart disease by almost 20, according to the Meatless Monday campaign. Check out our featured recipe below.

Go wild fish. When it comes to seafood, opt for wild and line caught varieties over farm raised, which can often be confined, medicated and fed dried food pellets made up of fish oil and fish meal (cannibal fish?). Plus,farm raised fish have been found to contain lower omega-3 levels and higher omega-6 fatty acid levels, a pro-inflammatory that you want to try and avoid.

Pay it forward. Supporting companies that use sustainable ingredients, processes and packaging while giving back to the environment and their local economies can continue to pay it forward with your purchase. Look for these practices on their packaging, social media and year end reports. Even if these products and services cost a little more, look at it as an investment into the future.

The Fit Foody…bringing you all the food that’s fit to eat.

h1

Protect Your Melons with Fruit + Veggies

October 8, 2010
Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables drastically reduces the risk of ever getting breast cancer and of having a recurrence. Scientists at the University of Hong Kong have just released more research findings adding to the growing pile of evidence that selections from the produce section are the best bet for keeping away this dreaded disease.

The association between vegetable and fruit intake and breast cancer risk was evaluated using a hospital-based, case-controlled study. Four hundred and thirty-eight breast cancer cases were matched with an equal number of controls by age and place of residency. Their dietary intake was assessed by face-to-face interviews using a food frequency questionnaire. Multivariate logistical regression was used to estimate odds ratios.

Total vegetable and fruit intake was found to be inversely associated with breast cancer risk. The odds ratios of the highest quartile relative to the lowest quartile of total vegetable and fruit intake were 0.28 and 0.53 respectively. This means that those eating the lowest amounts had a 47% increased risk of breast cancer. Consumption of individual vegetable and fruit groups such as dark green leafy vegetables, cruciferous vegetables, carrots, tomatoes, bananas, melons (watermelon, papaya, and cantaloupe) was inversely and significantly related to breast cancer risk. An inverse association was also observed for vitamin A, carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, and fiber intake. (International Journal of Cancer, July)

Fruits and vegetables modulate the cell cycle to safeguard health

People were created to eat fruits and vegetables. Several systems in the body depend on constituents from nature’s garden for proper functioning. One of these is the cell cycle that regulates the growth and maintenance of all living things. During the cell cycle, chromosomes are duplicated, and one copy of each duplicated chromosome is transferred from the mother cell to the daughter cell. Proper regulation of this cycle is critical for the normal development and maintenance of health in multi-cellular organisms. If the cell cycle is not working as it should, cancer and other degenerative diseases may be the result.

The successful reproduction of new cells depends on two critical processes, the replication of DNA, and mitosis (the nuclear division of the daughter cell from the mother cell). Compounds from fruits and vegetables stand guard over this process and assure successful completion. (Frontiers in Bioscience, January, 2008)

In a world in which more and more genotoxins are constantly bombarding people, a greater intake of fruits and vegetables is necessary to modulate the effects of deregulation at cell cycle checkpoints and keep the cycle running smoothly creating new cells that are healthy. Up to ten servings of fruits and vegetables each day are now recommended by some health gurus.

Fruits and vegetables can reduce breast cancer recurrence by 40 percent

Scientists from the University of California examined the relationship between plasma carotenoid concentration as a biomarker of fruit and vegetable intake and the risk for a new breast cancer event in 1,550 women previously treated for early stage breast cancer. After 5 years of follow-up, those women with the highest plasma carotenoid concentrations had a 40% reduced risk for breast cancer recurrence. (Journal of Clinical Oncology, September, 2005).

Carotenoids are natural fat-soluble pigments found in certain plants. They provide the bright red, orange, yellow, blue and purple colorations found in the vegetable kingdom. Famous members of this family include beta-carotene found in carrots, spinach, kale and cantaloupe; lycopene found in tomatoes, pink grapefruit, watermelon, papaya, and apricots; and lutein, found in dark green leafy vegetables and blueberries.

Since carotenoids need lipids to become bioactive in the body, salads full of these colorful vegetables should always be eaten with some type of fat. The liberal use of extra virgin olive oil on a salad is a great way to bring its carotenoids to life. Fruits and nuts is another tasty combination. The healthy fats found in the nuts will bring to life all the carotenoids in the fruits. Snacking on dried fruits and nuts satisfies the sweet tooth while loading up the body with carotenoids. For best digestion, eat the fruits first and then the nuts rather than eating them together.

Fruits and vegetables with the highest anti-cancer activity

Almost all fruits and vegetables have anti-cancer activity. The superstars of the research labs are garlic and onions, cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cabbage, kale, Brussels sprouts and greens), unbelliferous vegetables (carrots, celery, cilantro, parsley and parsnips), tomatoes, peppers, flax seeds, citrus, and soy. However, soy should never be eaten unless it is fermented in the traditional oriental manner and eaten as a small part of a mineral and protein rich meal.

Spirulina and chlorella are heavily pigmented microalgae. They are a nutrient rich vegetable food source rich in beta carotene and many other carotenoids, each with power to keep away breast cancer. They contain fatty acids to speed these carotenoids to work in the body.

Compounds from fruits and vegetables that have shown to help regulate the cell cycle include diindolymethane (DIM) from broccoli, apigenin from celery and parsley, curcumin from turmeric, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) from green tea, resveratrol from red grapes and peanuts, genistein from soybeans, and silymarin from milk thistle. These are widely available as supplements.

For more information:
http://www.naturalnews.com/025810.html
http://www.naturalnews.com/024958_f…
http://www.naturalnews.com/025441_v…

About the author

Barbara is a school psychologist, a published author in the area of personal finance, a breast cancer survivor using “alternative” treatments, a born existentialist, and a student of nature and all things natural.

h1

Raising PAM | iParenting Award | Pesky Pesticides

May 20, 2010

 

 

 

Being a mom is no joke. We carry, quite literally, on our hips the responsibility of bringing baby into the world. And there you are, leaving the hospital wondering…Um…Where’s the owner’s manual? Nursing, feeding, clothing, nurturing, soothing, incessant worrying and the frenetic, hair pulling task of making all the right choices to raise Jane to be a prodigious, healthy, happy, socially responsible person can leave you wondering if you really had the credentials for the job in the first place.    

 

This month, we set sail on a journey with Anna Getty’s Pregnancy Awareness Month (PAM), where moms-to-be got the 411 on a kinder, greener way to get started on the right foot – starting with mom’s health. Eco-celebs Mariel Hemingway, Ricki Lake and Josie Maran with experts Dr. Alan Greene, Kim Barnouin (HealthyBitchDaily), Gigi Chang (Plum Organics), Lisa Druxman (Stroller Strides Founder) and Christopher Gavigan (CEO Healthy Child Healthy World) provided invaluable information and insight into health and wellness. Eat Cleaner was there proudly alongside to show how you can take food safety into your own hands, because a diet filled with fresh, clean food for all moms is key. We’re honored to be part of the PAM community that is nurturing knowledge, support and celebrating the wonder of being a green mother. With friends like these, it’s not so scary after all.
Check out http://www.pregnancyawarenessmonth.com/ for info and tune into today’s Twitter party.



HOT PLATE! Eat Cleaner is the 2010 winner of the Disney iParenting Excellent Products Award! We got top honors in the Safety category for best new products.

CLICK HERE for the full scoop.



 



 

 

Make Eat Cleaner Your Business and Earn Real Green.

Promote Eat Cleaner products at your local farmer’s market, green events, festivals and to friends, family and neighbors with our easy start-up business kit. Part time and full time opportunities. Plant the seeds of your own success and reap the rewards faster than you can say ‘arugula.’

IMMEDIATE AVAILABILITY NATIONWIDE. To learn more, CLICK HERE or email us at info@eatcleaner.com with ‘MAKE EAT CLEANER MY BUSINESS’ in the subject line.

AFFILIATE PROGRAM

Want to earn cash in your sleep? Become an Eat Cleaner affiliate. It’s sooo easy. Just sign up, post one of our banner ads on your blog or website and make 25% of every sale that comes through to us. No cost to you. You’ll be counting $$$$ with your ZZZZ’s.

CLICK HERE to sign up.

 


 

Pesticide Panic

The latest research linking ADHD with a group of pesticides called organophosphates ripped through the news this week, setting off panic attack with fruit and veggie eaters everywhere. The real peril here is that people will peel back their intake of produce. Fact is there are ways to reduce toxins in your food, and healthy living expert Jordan Rubin spoke about why you would use our products on CNN. Here’s how to eat cleaner everyday:  

CLICK HERE to Watch Video

Give ‘em a real cleaning: We don’t have to tell you the importance of washing your food, but studies show you can eliminate much of the pesticide residue if you wash the surface thoroughly. Neither wax nor most pesticides are water soluble, so Eat Cleaner wash and wipes help to dissolve these barriers and get under the surface.

Wash frozen fruit + veggies: Studies showed that frozen fruit and vegetables showed a higher rate of pesticides, as consumers don’t generally think about washing them. Make sure to wash them or buy fresh, clean thoroughly, then show them to the freezer.

Organic produce still needs to be cleaned: Overspray and pesticide drift can still contaminate organic produce. Wash with Eat Cleaner to help get them as nature intended and give them a longer life.

Rinds and peels need a wash: Pesticide residue can contaminate the flesh if you don’t give them a good wash. Make sure to clean melons, oranges, grapefruit and other produce on the outside.

Pick from the Clean 15 instead of the Dirty Dozen: The Environmental Working Group created this list of the most and least sprayed fruits and vegetables. Make the ‘right ones’ your new friends and go organic and a good scrub with the ones on the left.

For the complete story linking ADHD to pesticide intake in children, CLICK HERE.

ENTER TO WIN one of 3 Eat Cleaner gift packs valued at $50 each from our friends at Garden of Life on Facebook. Click here to learn more.



Big Fruity Deal
The Eat Cleaner bunch is growing and we’re proud to announce our newest homes at Whole Foods in Texas and Stater Bros in California. Look for us in the produce aisles and on the meat counters and support our retailer partners who are helping families take food safety into their own hands. We are forever grateful.

California
Stater Bros (all stores)
Irvine Ranch Market
Farm Fresh to You
The Pump Station
Milkalicious
PC Greens
Erewhon
Vicente Foods
Full O’ Life
Coast Produce
Major Markets (Fallbrook, Escondido, CA)
Wholesome Choice (CA)
Pacific Ranch Market
Farmers Market at Marbella Plaza
Farm to Market
7-Eleven (Costa Mesa)

Washington State
Lemongrass

East Coast
Wegmans (most stores)
Wellnest

Texas
Whole Foods – Texas (20 stores)

Online
QVC.com
Greenthology.com
Alice.com
Amazon.com
Theecoluxelife.com
Shft.com
Worldofgreen.com



 


JOIN :: WATCH :: FOLLOW :: LEARN

 


 

Talk to Us
Have a story about how Eat Cleaner has worked for you? 
Email us at info@eatcleaner.com and you’ll receive
a set of 2 reusable Eat Cleaner Produce Bags.
You can be our featured testimonial on our home page.

 

 

 

 
 
 
h1

Freshway Recall: Lettuce think before we bite

May 7, 2010

When will the madness end?  When people start taking food safety into their own hands.  It’s why we created Eat Cleaner in the first place.  Using the power of plant science, we give you a simple way to protect your family’s plate.  Restaurants, caterers and anyone serving food to others should also take heed.  The two minutes it takes to wash with Eat Cleaner can make a big difference in the lives you love.

Read these stories from members of S.T.O.P. (Safe Tables Our Priority) and learn why events like these should make us all think before we bite.

Washing with Eat Cleaner can help prevent your risk of E.coli infection.

By Lauren Bush and Valerie Threlkeld

Valerie

There is not a more helpless feeling than to have your healthy, beautiful 20-year-old daughter call you from 200 miles away and tell you something is physically wrong with her. It is a feeling I know all too well.

The symptoms my daughter described to me didn’t resemble anything that a young woman should encounter. Hospital personnel couldn’t seem to diagnose the problem – they were only able to rule things out. She then had to endure going from office to office to get records and test results while barely able to stand. When her dad brought her home, after racing 400 miles round trip, we took her to an urgent care center. The medical professionals there, too, sent her home with us.

The next day my daughter Lauren was directly admitted to the hospital. The horrifying battery of painful tests that followed was almost more than she could endure. Finally, after nearly having surgery to remove her colon, the news broke that there was an E. coli outbreak from baby spinach. Lauren recalled she had eaten a large baby spinach salad a few days before. She was tested for this particularly lethal strain of E. coli and it was confirmed. After spending a week in the hospital with strong IV antibiotics, she was discharged – 20 pounds lighter and very weak.

This was the most trying time our family has ever experienced. Lauren lost an entire semester of college, had to move back home, and experienced depression and other lingering physical changes from this horrifying illness. We continue to hope shewill not have long-term health impacts and will be able to enjoy good health.

This scenario should be in the minds of congressional lawmakers. My child is only one of thousands who have suffered due to shortfalls in the current food-safety system. Fortunately her story had a happy ending, but other families she has met while speaking in Washington have not been so lucky.

Lauren has traveled to Washington three times to speak about her experience. This is an easy subject to overlook until it affects you personally. The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (S.510) would make a difference to not only our family but to the many others who count on our government to do the right thing. Senators, please give me and mothers around the country the Mother’s Day gift we have been waiting far too long for – safer food.

Lauren

Despite growing up in a small town in rural Kentucky, I had big dreams in store for my future. I wanted to go to law school, live in New York City and change and conquer the world. I never imagined in planning to reach these goals that I should have left room to be sickened by food, be forced to leave college and almost die in the process.

Nevertheless, as I began my junior year of college at the University of Kentucky, I ate a spinach salad infected with hemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7. I was hospitalized for a total of two weeks and was in recovery for six months.

The first two years after my traumatic, sudden illness I felt very uncomfortable discussing what happened with anyone because foodborne illness is an ugly journey. There is blood, diarrhea, tears, and nausea, and pain — tremendous amounts of pain. Then last summer I was contacted by the New York Times for an article regarding food safety and came to realize that my voice could make a difference. It could save others from the same life-changing experience, or at least I thought it could.

I have now been to Washington, D.C., three times in the last year with Safe Tables Our Priority (S.T.O.P.) and the Make Our Food Safe coalition. I have met with my representatives, written letters, and told my story what feels like hundreds of times. Unfortunately, my voice can only travel so far. Until government officials in Washington realize the devastatingly negative impact that unsafe food can cause and move forward on passing the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (S. 510), we will all continue to be in danger.

There have been several large national outbreaks of contaminated food products since the spinach outbreak that made me sick. My only question is: What is Congress waiting for?

Go to http://actionnetwork.org/campaign/mothersletter and sign your name to a letter to Congress from moms just like you pushing action on food safety legislation.

This blogpost taken from:  http://www.momsrising.org/blog/food-safety-reform-cannot-wait-a-mother-daughters-story/

E. coli forces lettuce recall; 19 ill in 3 states

By Marie Clare Jalonick

WASHINGTON — A food company is recalling lettuce sold in 23 states and the District of Columbia because of an E. coli outbreak that has sickened at least 19 people, three of them with life-threatening symptoms.

The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday that 12 people had been hospitalized and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it was looking at 10 other cases probably linked to the outbreak.

Freshway Foods of Sidney, Ohio, said it was recalling romaine lettuce sold under the Freshway and Imperial Sysco brands because of a possible link to the E. coli outbreak.

College students at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Ohio State in Columbus and Daemen College in Amherst, N.Y., are among those affected, according to local health departments in those states.

The FDA is focusing its investigation on lettuce grown in Arizona as a possible source for the outbreak, according to two people who have been briefed by the agency. Donna Rosenbaum, director of the food safety advocacy group Safe Tables Our Priority and one of those briefed, said the agency held a phone call with public health advocates Thursday.

Rosenbaum and other public health advocates have long been pushing for stronger food safety laws. The House passed a bill last year that would give the agency much more authority to police food production, but the Senate has not acted on it.

The New York state Public Health Laboratory in Albany discovered the contamination in a bag of Freshway Foods shredded romaine lettuce on Wednesday after local authorities had been investigating the outbreak for several weeks. The bag of lettuce came from a processing facility that was also linked to the illnesses, the FDA said. The agency would not disclose the name of that facility or its location but said an investigation was under way.

E. coli infection can cause mild diarrhea or more severe complications, including kidney damage. The three patients with life-threatening symptoms were diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, which can cause bleeding in the brain or kidneys.

It was not immediately clear why students on college campuses were sickened. Freshway Foods said the lettuce was sold to wholesalers, food service outlets, in-store salad bars and delis.

Susan Cerniglia, spokeswoman for the public health department in Washtenaw County, where the University of Michigan is located, said it doesn’t appear that students who were sickened ate the contaminated food on campus. It is believed they may have been sickened at local restaurants, she said. Most of those sickened lived in Ann Arbor and not on campus.

The Erie County, N.Y., health department issued an alert late last month that linked at least one diagnosis of E. coli to a student who ate at a Daemen College dining facility. The alert said twelve students had been sickened after eating at the school and three students were hospitalized.

Kevin Montgomery of the Erie health department said Thursday that one case of E. coli was confirmed at Daemen College and another was suspected. All of the students have now recovered, he said.

The most common strain of E. coli found in U.S. patients is E. coli O157. The CDC said the strain linked to the lettuce, E. coli 0145, is more difficult to identify and may go unreported.

Freshway Foods said in a statement Thursday that the FDA informed the company about the positive test in New York on Wednesday afternoon. The statement said “an extensive FDA investigation” of Freshway Foods’ facility in Sidney has not uncovered any contamination at the plant.

The recalled lettuce has a “best if used by” date of May 12 or earlier. The recall also affects “grab and go” salads sold at Kroger, Giant Eagle, Ingles Markets and Marsh grocery stores.

The lettuce was sold in Alabama, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

This article taken from:  http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hEnc00D5YgQjLxbZqLLkjOw_fwzgD9FI0FRO1

h1

The Leaner in Cleaner

April 19, 2010

For us, diet is a 4-letter word. It conjures up visions of starvation, sacrifice and self-induced torture and ultimately, sabotage. When you have to find excuses to cheat no other than your own conscience, you know there’s something broken. If you’re a fan of word puzzles then you don’t need to look much further than our very own moniker to shedding unwanted pounds. 

Get Lean by Getting Cleaner. 

Our very own sales and marketing manager extraordinaire Ninfa is living proof. Just like a beautiful banana, she peeled off 15 pounds just by making a few small changes in her diet. Cleaner fruits and vegetables. Fewer chips and soda. Nutrient denser, Less processed foods. She looks great and feels more energetic and she’s getting her family on board. It’s a formula my 4 year-old can recite: Lots of fresh fruit and vegetables + lean protein and plenty of alkaline water = happy, healthy physiques. 

The ‘er’ in the everyday goes a long way to empowering yourself and everyone around you. Lean back, lean back. 

  


 Junk Food Confessions

When you’re about to say something you shouldn’t, you might bite your tongue. The fact is much or your ability to control your entire body lies in that little pink bundle of muscle. Your natural ability to sense sweet, sour, salty and bitter are there but sweet and salty are heightened by your sense of smell, making foods that fall into those categories that much more difficult to resist.   

Don’t despair. For every ‘vice’, there’s a delicious alternative that will satisfy your cravings and your wagging tongue’s need to feed. It may just require a little retraining for your tongue. Even kids have to try something new 8 times before they give them the boot.  

Here’s just a few of our EAT Cleaner solutions that deliver sounder nutrition with every guilt-free bite. Just don’t eat the whole bag.  

POTATO CHIPS
Homemade: Baked whole wheat spelt or pita chips with Chia or Flax seed or Kale brushed with olive oil and dusted with paprika.
Store bought: Annie Chun’s Seaweed strips – Try Wasabi flavored, they’re addictive OR Food Should Taste This Good chips – come in sweet potato and flax seed flavors.
 

 

SODA
Homemade: Sparkling or Ionized water with Fresh Cucumber slices and a squeeze of Lime or a light puree of fresh fruit.
Store bought: Izze Sparkling Juice – Clementine and Pomegranate flavors satisfy your sweet and fizzy cravings with no artificial flavors or sweeteners
 

 

FRENCH FRIES
Homemade French Bean Fries, Carrot Sticks and Zucchini Spears steamed, then lightly brushed with sesame oil and sesame seeds and then baked in the oven until crisp.
Store bought: Trader Joe’s Sweet Potato Fries baked in the oven and coated with fresh garlic and parsley
 

 

CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES
Homemade: Toasted spelt tortillas with almond butter and honey or oatmeal cookies filled with date. Get The Recipe
Store bought: Kashi Oatmeal Raisin Flax Cookies – try them heated for just a quick minute to soften them up – OR Larabar raw bars in Chocolate Coconut.
 

 

ICE CREAM
Homemade: Blend almond milk with your favorite Greek yogurt and a spoon of honey and a few spoonfuls of raw almonds. Freeze and eat.
Store Bought:Ciao Bella Gelato, made with real ingredients. Just a few bites should do the trick.
 


 


Get a SIGNED Copy of Anna’s EASY GREEN ORGANIC.

An ode to one of our favorite green holidays, we’re found this ANDI-friendly, nutrient dense kale patty that we’re sure you’ll flip for – whether you’re Irish or not. Pinch me, I’m in green heaven!  

 

We love Anna Getty for so many reasons. She’s an heiress, chef, and rock-steady chick with a sustainable vision who happens to be a great friend of Eat Cleaner. Her new book Easy Green Organic is a visual feast with real recipes that will become mainstays for your family.  

To call it a cookbook would not do it justice. Anna takes the concept further, explaining how to shop for organic, seasonal, and local ingredients; how to keep an eco-friendly kitchen; and how to cook meals that are as scrumptious to eat as they are healthful for the earth.  

Our favorites are the Quinoa Croquettes with Cilantro Yogurt Sauce for dipping and the Strawberry Arugula Salad. Sweets like Coconut Custard with Fresh Mango and Mint Chutney and Pear and Blueberry Crisp with Brown Sugar Sour Cream are just two of the functional favorites on our menu.  

Pick up a SPECIAL SIGNED copy of Easy Green Organic on our website HERE. A portion of the proceeds benefits the non-profit Healthy Child Healthy World.





h1

Skinny Bitch digs Eat Cleaner…and we heart her, too!

February 18, 2010

We inhale every book we can get our hands on that dishes the dirt on the food we eat.  And there’s one that we’ve fallen in love with for its straight up, trashy talkin, no b.s. approach and that’s Skinny Bitch, the New York Times Bestseller co-authored by Kim Barnouin.  I had the wonderful fortune of meeting Kim at the Go Green Expo in LA last month with a former colleague of mine, Julie, co-founder of healthybitchdaily.com – a fortunate twist of fate!  After sharing our products, Kim provided us with this amazing testimonial on Eat Cleaner products, below.  If you haven’t read the book, I highly recommend it for its honest look at the food on our plates. Don’t let the title fool you!  It’ not about getting skinny, it’s a wake-up call served up like warm revenge against GMO’s, soda and artificial anything by a couple of sassy sistas.  The theme here is all-around health and consciousness around what you stick in your mouth. A slick guide for eating cleaner, which is right up our alley.

You can also get Kim’s mouthfuls daily on her blog @healthybitchdaily.com.  Sign up and getit delivered to your inbox faster than a (vegan)pizza.

“As a health nut and neurotic mother, I am a diehard fan of EAT CLEANER Fruit + Vegetable Wash. With the number of pesticides and harmful chemicals farmers spray on our produce, rinsing with water just doesn’t suffice anymore. EAT CLEANER gives me the peace of mind to know that safe, fresh and healthy food for my family and I, is just a quick wipe away.”

Kim Barnouin, New York Times best selling author of Skinny Bitch weighs in on Eat Cleaner.

%d bloggers like this: