Posts Tagged ‘vegetables’

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Waste not, save more: How to make every bite count

April 21, 2011

Rachel Zoe on Waste...at least that's what we think she'd say

 Waste not, save more. 

With the escalating prices of everyday life and a belt-tightening economy, everyone is more mindful of where their green is going. Yet, if you were to peek into your local landfill, you’d find almost 40% of it from fresh food – a waste of precious resources and a weight on the environment. 25% of our water and 4% of oil go into food that ends up in the trash, and it costs the U.S. $1B (with a B) dollars a year just to deal with disposal. To add to the pile, methane gas from food waste is 21x more harmful to the environment than car emissions.*

Give your fruit + veggies a wash before they chill.  We know, you’ve been trained to wait until you’re ready to use it.  But that’s because they’re talking about using water.  You, my friend, know better. Eat Cleaner Fruit + Vegetable Wash extends your shelf life and helps make your fruit and veggies ‘fast food’ because they’re ready to eat in a flash.  Clean it, dry it and store it.

 

Break bread with friends and family.  Nothing like gathering people you love around the table or sharing food with someone.  It not only brings you closer together, it helps avoid waste.  Swap nights where one cooks and the other cleans up and bring a little extra to work to share with your cohorts.  It’s amazing what a little food can do to break the ice, too!

Give it back to the earth. Collect that organic goodness and complete the life cycle.  Compost is one of the best way to feed your garden, flowers and herbs.   Most local waste management companies will even provide one to you at little or no cost.  For more info on becoming a safer, cleaner composter, click here for a how-to primer.

*Source:  Dept. of Agriculture, Science NOW.

How can you make every bite more earth wise?  Try these 6 on for size.

Avoid Take Out. According to cleanair.org, the US population tosses out paper bags & plastic cups, forks & spoons every year to circle the equator 300 times! That $.99 burrito may seem cheaper and more convenient in the short run but all that packaging – disposable trays, bags, cups and cutlery – has to go somewhere!

Make a list, shop for it once. Gas has gone through the roof! If you make a list, shop for your ingredients once, and plan your meals for the week, you can maximize your resources and time. Store them in reusable containers and take them to work and have plenty ready for the kids’ lunchboxes. Getting organized will save you time and after all, who has time to waste?

Shop seasonally. The further food has to travel, the longer the carbon footprint behind it. When it comes to fresh fruit and veggies, check to see if they’ve trekked around the globe before you buy them. The NRDC’s Simple Steps website is a good resource to find fresh produce in season depending on where you live and the time of year.

Meat-less. It’s estimated 1,800 to 2,500 gallons of water go into a single pound of beef compared to about 200 pounds of tofu. Cutting down on meat consumption just once a week can also reduce your risk of heart disease by almost 20, according to the Meatless Monday campaign. Check out our featured recipe below.

Go wild fish. When it comes to seafood, opt for wild and line caught varieties over farm raised, which can often be confined, medicated and fed dried food pellets made up of fish oil and fish meal (cannibal fish?). Plus,farm raised fish have been found to contain lower omega-3 levels and higher omega-6 fatty acid levels, a pro-inflammatory that you want to try and avoid.

Pay it forward. Supporting companies that use sustainable ingredients, processes and packaging while giving back to the environment and their local economies can continue to pay it forward with your purchase. Look for these practices on their packaging, social media and year end reports. Even if these products and services cost a little more, look at it as an investment into the future.

The Fit Foody…bringing you all the food that’s fit to eat.

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I HEART Farmers Markets

June 4, 2010

Here at Eat Cleaner, we live to roam the farmers markets.  There’s something so inviting about buying fresh food straight from the producer and what’s not to love about a leisurely walk through an open air market on a bright, Spring day? 

Personally, it takes me back to my childhood growing up in Egypt where my grandfather, Giddou in Arabic, would take me by the hand and lead me through the fruit and vegetable vendor stalls in the open air market of Alexandria in pursuit of the day’s bounty.  Finger-slim, purple aubergines, buxom, crimson tomatoes and verdant, leafy herbs piled high among an array of fragrant, earth colors sat side by side, vendors hawking their prized produce to the sea of shoppers with their mesh carry-alls in hand.  Giddou would smell, squeeze and prod at the picks before him to choose the finest he could find, haggling with the vendors for the best price.  We’d proudly display our farm fresh assortment to the rest of the family, which would inevitably come together with fresh garlic, vinegar and olive oil for our mid-day feast.

We’re taking our love of farmer’s markets to you with an opportunity to sell Eat Cleaner at your local open air destination. We also have opportunities to sell Eat Cleaner to friends, family and connections at home.   Just click on the EAT CLEANER DISTRIBUTOR INFORMATION FORM below and email us at:  Info@eatcleaner.com for more information.

EatCleaner_Distributor Information

EAT CLEANER is a proud member of the Farmer's Market Coalition

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Freshway Recall: Lettuce think before we bite

May 7, 2010

When will the madness end?  When people start taking food safety into their own hands.  It’s why we created Eat Cleaner in the first place.  Using the power of plant science, we give you a simple way to protect your family’s plate.  Restaurants, caterers and anyone serving food to others should also take heed.  The two minutes it takes to wash with Eat Cleaner can make a big difference in the lives you love.

Read these stories from members of S.T.O.P. (Safe Tables Our Priority) and learn why events like these should make us all think before we bite.

Washing with Eat Cleaner can help prevent your risk of E.coli infection.

By Lauren Bush and Valerie Threlkeld

Valerie

There is not a more helpless feeling than to have your healthy, beautiful 20-year-old daughter call you from 200 miles away and tell you something is physically wrong with her. It is a feeling I know all too well.

The symptoms my daughter described to me didn’t resemble anything that a young woman should encounter. Hospital personnel couldn’t seem to diagnose the problem – they were only able to rule things out. She then had to endure going from office to office to get records and test results while barely able to stand. When her dad brought her home, after racing 400 miles round trip, we took her to an urgent care center. The medical professionals there, too, sent her home with us.

The next day my daughter Lauren was directly admitted to the hospital. The horrifying battery of painful tests that followed was almost more than she could endure. Finally, after nearly having surgery to remove her colon, the news broke that there was an E. coli outbreak from baby spinach. Lauren recalled she had eaten a large baby spinach salad a few days before. She was tested for this particularly lethal strain of E. coli and it was confirmed. After spending a week in the hospital with strong IV antibiotics, she was discharged – 20 pounds lighter and very weak.

This was the most trying time our family has ever experienced. Lauren lost an entire semester of college, had to move back home, and experienced depression and other lingering physical changes from this horrifying illness. We continue to hope shewill not have long-term health impacts and will be able to enjoy good health.

This scenario should be in the minds of congressional lawmakers. My child is only one of thousands who have suffered due to shortfalls in the current food-safety system. Fortunately her story had a happy ending, but other families she has met while speaking in Washington have not been so lucky.

Lauren has traveled to Washington three times to speak about her experience. This is an easy subject to overlook until it affects you personally. The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (S.510) would make a difference to not only our family but to the many others who count on our government to do the right thing. Senators, please give me and mothers around the country the Mother’s Day gift we have been waiting far too long for – safer food.

Lauren

Despite growing up in a small town in rural Kentucky, I had big dreams in store for my future. I wanted to go to law school, live in New York City and change and conquer the world. I never imagined in planning to reach these goals that I should have left room to be sickened by food, be forced to leave college and almost die in the process.

Nevertheless, as I began my junior year of college at the University of Kentucky, I ate a spinach salad infected with hemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7. I was hospitalized for a total of two weeks and was in recovery for six months.

The first two years after my traumatic, sudden illness I felt very uncomfortable discussing what happened with anyone because foodborne illness is an ugly journey. There is blood, diarrhea, tears, and nausea, and pain — tremendous amounts of pain. Then last summer I was contacted by the New York Times for an article regarding food safety and came to realize that my voice could make a difference. It could save others from the same life-changing experience, or at least I thought it could.

I have now been to Washington, D.C., three times in the last year with Safe Tables Our Priority (S.T.O.P.) and the Make Our Food Safe coalition. I have met with my representatives, written letters, and told my story what feels like hundreds of times. Unfortunately, my voice can only travel so far. Until government officials in Washington realize the devastatingly negative impact that unsafe food can cause and move forward on passing the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (S. 510), we will all continue to be in danger.

There have been several large national outbreaks of contaminated food products since the spinach outbreak that made me sick. My only question is: What is Congress waiting for?

Go to http://actionnetwork.org/campaign/mothersletter and sign your name to a letter to Congress from moms just like you pushing action on food safety legislation.

This blogpost taken from:  http://www.momsrising.org/blog/food-safety-reform-cannot-wait-a-mother-daughters-story/

E. coli forces lettuce recall; 19 ill in 3 states

By Marie Clare Jalonick

WASHINGTON — A food company is recalling lettuce sold in 23 states and the District of Columbia because of an E. coli outbreak that has sickened at least 19 people, three of them with life-threatening symptoms.

The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday that 12 people had been hospitalized and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it was looking at 10 other cases probably linked to the outbreak.

Freshway Foods of Sidney, Ohio, said it was recalling romaine lettuce sold under the Freshway and Imperial Sysco brands because of a possible link to the E. coli outbreak.

College students at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Ohio State in Columbus and Daemen College in Amherst, N.Y., are among those affected, according to local health departments in those states.

The FDA is focusing its investigation on lettuce grown in Arizona as a possible source for the outbreak, according to two people who have been briefed by the agency. Donna Rosenbaum, director of the food safety advocacy group Safe Tables Our Priority and one of those briefed, said the agency held a phone call with public health advocates Thursday.

Rosenbaum and other public health advocates have long been pushing for stronger food safety laws. The House passed a bill last year that would give the agency much more authority to police food production, but the Senate has not acted on it.

The New York state Public Health Laboratory in Albany discovered the contamination in a bag of Freshway Foods shredded romaine lettuce on Wednesday after local authorities had been investigating the outbreak for several weeks. The bag of lettuce came from a processing facility that was also linked to the illnesses, the FDA said. The agency would not disclose the name of that facility or its location but said an investigation was under way.

E. coli infection can cause mild diarrhea or more severe complications, including kidney damage. The three patients with life-threatening symptoms were diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, which can cause bleeding in the brain or kidneys.

It was not immediately clear why students on college campuses were sickened. Freshway Foods said the lettuce was sold to wholesalers, food service outlets, in-store salad bars and delis.

Susan Cerniglia, spokeswoman for the public health department in Washtenaw County, where the University of Michigan is located, said it doesn’t appear that students who were sickened ate the contaminated food on campus. It is believed they may have been sickened at local restaurants, she said. Most of those sickened lived in Ann Arbor and not on campus.

The Erie County, N.Y., health department issued an alert late last month that linked at least one diagnosis of E. coli to a student who ate at a Daemen College dining facility. The alert said twelve students had been sickened after eating at the school and three students were hospitalized.

Kevin Montgomery of the Erie health department said Thursday that one case of E. coli was confirmed at Daemen College and another was suspected. All of the students have now recovered, he said.

The most common strain of E. coli found in U.S. patients is E. coli O157. The CDC said the strain linked to the lettuce, E. coli 0145, is more difficult to identify and may go unreported.

Freshway Foods said in a statement Thursday that the FDA informed the company about the positive test in New York on Wednesday afternoon. The statement said “an extensive FDA investigation” of Freshway Foods’ facility in Sidney has not uncovered any contamination at the plant.

The recalled lettuce has a “best if used by” date of May 12 or earlier. The recall also affects “grab and go” salads sold at Kroger, Giant Eagle, Ingles Markets and Marsh grocery stores.

The lettuce was sold in Alabama, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

This article taken from:  http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hEnc00D5YgQjLxbZqLLkjOw_fwzgD9FI0FRO1

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The Leaner in Cleaner

April 19, 2010

For us, diet is a 4-letter word. It conjures up visions of starvation, sacrifice and self-induced torture and ultimately, sabotage. When you have to find excuses to cheat no other than your own conscience, you know there’s something broken. If you’re a fan of word puzzles then you don’t need to look much further than our very own moniker to shedding unwanted pounds. 

Get Lean by Getting Cleaner. 

Our very own sales and marketing manager extraordinaire Ninfa is living proof. Just like a beautiful banana, she peeled off 15 pounds just by making a few small changes in her diet. Cleaner fruits and vegetables. Fewer chips and soda. Nutrient denser, Less processed foods. She looks great and feels more energetic and she’s getting her family on board. It’s a formula my 4 year-old can recite: Lots of fresh fruit and vegetables + lean protein and plenty of alkaline water = happy, healthy physiques. 

The ‘er’ in the everyday goes a long way to empowering yourself and everyone around you. Lean back, lean back. 

  


 Junk Food Confessions

When you’re about to say something you shouldn’t, you might bite your tongue. The fact is much or your ability to control your entire body lies in that little pink bundle of muscle. Your natural ability to sense sweet, sour, salty and bitter are there but sweet and salty are heightened by your sense of smell, making foods that fall into those categories that much more difficult to resist.   

Don’t despair. For every ‘vice’, there’s a delicious alternative that will satisfy your cravings and your wagging tongue’s need to feed. It may just require a little retraining for your tongue. Even kids have to try something new 8 times before they give them the boot.  

Here’s just a few of our EAT Cleaner solutions that deliver sounder nutrition with every guilt-free bite. Just don’t eat the whole bag.  

POTATO CHIPS
Homemade: Baked whole wheat spelt or pita chips with Chia or Flax seed or Kale brushed with olive oil and dusted with paprika.
Store bought: Annie Chun’s Seaweed strips – Try Wasabi flavored, they’re addictive OR Food Should Taste This Good chips – come in sweet potato and flax seed flavors.
 

 

SODA
Homemade: Sparkling or Ionized water with Fresh Cucumber slices and a squeeze of Lime or a light puree of fresh fruit.
Store bought: Izze Sparkling Juice – Clementine and Pomegranate flavors satisfy your sweet and fizzy cravings with no artificial flavors or sweeteners
 

 

FRENCH FRIES
Homemade French Bean Fries, Carrot Sticks and Zucchini Spears steamed, then lightly brushed with sesame oil and sesame seeds and then baked in the oven until crisp.
Store bought: Trader Joe’s Sweet Potato Fries baked in the oven and coated with fresh garlic and parsley
 

 

CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES
Homemade: Toasted spelt tortillas with almond butter and honey or oatmeal cookies filled with date. Get The Recipe
Store bought: Kashi Oatmeal Raisin Flax Cookies – try them heated for just a quick minute to soften them up – OR Larabar raw bars in Chocolate Coconut.
 

 

ICE CREAM
Homemade: Blend almond milk with your favorite Greek yogurt and a spoon of honey and a few spoonfuls of raw almonds. Freeze and eat.
Store Bought:Ciao Bella Gelato, made with real ingredients. Just a few bites should do the trick.
 


 


Get a SIGNED Copy of Anna’s EASY GREEN ORGANIC.

An ode to one of our favorite green holidays, we’re found this ANDI-friendly, nutrient dense kale patty that we’re sure you’ll flip for – whether you’re Irish or not. Pinch me, I’m in green heaven!  

 

We love Anna Getty for so many reasons. She’s an heiress, chef, and rock-steady chick with a sustainable vision who happens to be a great friend of Eat Cleaner. Her new book Easy Green Organic is a visual feast with real recipes that will become mainstays for your family.  

To call it a cookbook would not do it justice. Anna takes the concept further, explaining how to shop for organic, seasonal, and local ingredients; how to keep an eco-friendly kitchen; and how to cook meals that are as scrumptious to eat as they are healthful for the earth.  

Our favorites are the Quinoa Croquettes with Cilantro Yogurt Sauce for dipping and the Strawberry Arugula Salad. Sweets like Coconut Custard with Fresh Mango and Mint Chutney and Pear and Blueberry Crisp with Brown Sugar Sour Cream are just two of the functional favorites on our menu.  

Pick up a SPECIAL SIGNED copy of Easy Green Organic on our website HERE. A portion of the proceeds benefits the non-profit Healthy Child Healthy World.





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Skinny Bitch digs Eat Cleaner…and we heart her, too!

February 18, 2010

We inhale every book we can get our hands on that dishes the dirt on the food we eat.  And there’s one that we’ve fallen in love with for its straight up, trashy talkin, no b.s. approach and that’s Skinny Bitch, the New York Times Bestseller co-authored by Kim Barnouin.  I had the wonderful fortune of meeting Kim at the Go Green Expo in LA last month with a former colleague of mine, Julie, co-founder of healthybitchdaily.com – a fortunate twist of fate!  After sharing our products, Kim provided us with this amazing testimonial on Eat Cleaner products, below.  If you haven’t read the book, I highly recommend it for its honest look at the food on our plates. Don’t let the title fool you!  It’ not about getting skinny, it’s a wake-up call served up like warm revenge against GMO’s, soda and artificial anything by a couple of sassy sistas.  The theme here is all-around health and consciousness around what you stick in your mouth. A slick guide for eating cleaner, which is right up our alley.

You can also get Kim’s mouthfuls daily on her blog @healthybitchdaily.com.  Sign up and getit delivered to your inbox faster than a (vegan)pizza.

“As a health nut and neurotic mother, I am a diehard fan of EAT CLEANER Fruit + Vegetable Wash. With the number of pesticides and harmful chemicals farmers spray on our produce, rinsing with water just doesn’t suffice anymore. EAT CLEANER gives me the peace of mind to know that safe, fresh and healthy food for my family and I, is just a quick wipe away.”

Kim Barnouin, New York Times best selling author of Skinny Bitch weighs in on Eat Cleaner.

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Protection of Food Supply Faces Problems

February 12, 2010

HOT PLATE UPDATE

By Bill Whitaker

(CBS)  When it comes to agriculture, America is indeed the land of plenty. Foods raised here and imported from around the world provide greater abundance and choice than ever before. But while our foods are bountiful, they’re also inconsistently regulated.

The U.S. has one of the safest food supplies in the world, but the report card is mixed, reports CBS News Correspondent Bill Whitaker. Every year 33 percent of Canadians get sick from what they eat. In the U.S., it’s 25 percent. But in England it’s only 2 percent and in France just 1 percent. In both places food is grown more locally and on a smaller scale than in North America.
For part of the CBS News series “Where America Stands,” a recent poll found that just one in three Americans are very confident that the food they buy is safe although the vast majority are at least somewhat confident that their food is safe.

Special Report: “Where America Stands”

Safety always comes first in 12-year-old Rylee Gustafson’s kitchen.
“I need to wash my hands … I touched my jeans,” Gustafson said in her Henderson, Nev., home recently. She, more than anyone, knows that even good food can hurt you. In 2006, on her 9th birthday, she ate a spinach salad and was infected with a virulent strain of e-coli.
“It felt like killer pain, and my organs started to shut down,” Gustafson told Whitaker.
Kathleen Chrismer, Rylee’s mother, told Whitaker that she panicked when she didn’t know what was hurting her daughter.
“You really didn’t think you were going to pull through?” Whitaker asked Gustafson.
“I really felt that bad,” she said.
She spent 35 days in the hospital on dialysis. Today she’s still wary of fresh fruits and vegetables and has a damaged heart, kidney and vocal chords.

The Problem
Her story is just one example of the problem of food safety. Over the last few years, widespread outbreaks in spinach, tomatoes, peppers and peanut products sickened thousands and killed nearly a dozen Americans. Every year there are 76 million cases of foodborne illness in the United States, resulting in 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths.

Today Americans consume more fresh produce, increasingly from imports from around the world. But imported produce is inspected even less than home-grown harvests. “Ninety-nine percent of the food that you’re buying at the grocery store that comes from foreign coutnries has not been inspected by the FDA,” said Erik Olson, director of food and consumer product safety at the Pew Charitable Trusts.  Olson says the Food and Drug Administration is simply not up to the task. The FDA is responsible for 80 percent of the food supply, which is everything but meat and poultry.

The number of food producers under FDA jurisdiction has increased, but the number of inspections is going down. Between 2001 and 2007, the number of domestic food producers increased from 51,000 to 65,500. At the same time, the number of producers inspected fell from 14,721 to 14,566, according to the Government Accountability Office.  “They simply do not have the tools to really protect our food supply,” Olson told Whitaker. 

Gustafson traveled to Washington to share her story with members of Congress. She’ll probably need a kidney transplant when she’s a teenager. Until then, she just wants to see this bill pass.  “I would love to see that so people don’t have to take the risk,” Gustafson told Whitaker. “They know that it’s probably not gonna have a bacteria that’s gonna kill you or your child.”  Having safe food, she says, is not too much to ask.

This article may be found in full at:  http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/01/09/eveningnews/main6076565.shtml?tag=contentMain;contentBody

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Eat Cleaner Living Tip #14 – // Enhance your palate with a palette

February 8, 2010

You might think of your mom nagging you to eat all your peas but we all know that getting enough fruit and vegetables along with lean protein into our diet is the healthy basis of a sound diet.  The USDA used to recommend 5 servings a day but now we need to strive for 9.  So if I can barely squeeze an apple into my schedule, how does one get 5-9, Ms. Eat Cleaner?

 
Enhance your palate with a palette.  Getting into the 5-9 mindset is like painting.  Imagine a plate of plain white couscous, much like a canvas.  Like an artist’s palette, add a splash of ruby red beets, a dab of verdant green spinach, strokes of ochre squash and carrot orange and you can start to feel the energy build.  Eating a bowl of cereal?  Throw in a handful of berries.  Munching on a panini?  Heap on fresh arugula and slices of ripe tomato.  Twirling fettuccine?  Mix in sauteed kale or a handful of fresh fava beans and just like that, you’ve got an edible masterpiece.

Enhance your palate with a palette
 
Filling your plate with an array of vibrant color every time you eat can be a welcome treat vs. a dreaded feat if you celebrate what’s in season.  Check out the Fruit & Veggies Matter Calculator to see if you’re getting enough based on your sex, activity level and age.
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