Posts Tagged ‘veggies’

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TOTAL RECALL: Think before you bite 5/13

May 13, 2011

 

 Salmonella in More Tomato Products

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – May 7, 2011 – Mann Packing is voluntarily recalling certain vegetable platters and Snacks on the Go product because the grape tomato ingredient may be contaminated with Salmonella. As of today this recall has expanded to include Safeway’s Eating Right Veggie Party Platter with “best if used by dates” and in stores specified below.

This recall is part of a larger recall initiated by Six L’s Packing (Immokalee, Fla) on April 29, 2011. Six L’s is recalling a single lot of grape tomatoes packed on April 11, 2011 that can be identified by Cherry Berry lot code DW-H.

The contamination was detected through a random sample obtained by the USDA at a distributor in New York. The tomatoes were grown at a farm in Estero, Fla. which has since ceased production. The strain of Salmonella has not been determined and no illnesses have been reported.

This nationwide, voluntary recall, by Mann Packing includes the following items with best if used by dates ranging from 05-09 to 05-16 2011.

• Safeway’s Eating Right Veggie Party Platter (universal product code 79893-10708, weight 3 pounds, 6 ounces) sold at Carrs, Dominick’s, Genuardi’s, Pavilions, Randall’s, Safeway, Tom Thumb, and Vons.
• Mann’s Veggies On the Go (universal product code 16519 01411-6, weight 1 pound, 2 ounces).
• Mann’s Snacks on the Go with Celery, Carrots, Tomatoes (universal product code16519 01501-4, weight 8.75 ounces).
• Mann’s Vegetable Platter Large (universal product code 16519 01407-9, 2 pounds, 8 ounces).

The voluntary recall does not include any other products packed or distributed by Mann Packing.

Salmonella is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy people may experience fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea (which may be bloody), and abdominal pain. In rare cases the organism can get into the bloodstream and cause more serious complications (for more information visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s website at www.cdc.gov).

Mann Packing is working with its customers to remove the subject products from distribution. The appropriate regulatory agency has been notified.

Retailers have been contacted and asked to identify, segregate and hold all products matching the information included in this notice.

Consumers who purchased the specific items mentioned above are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. Customers and consumers with questions may contact Mann Packing at 1-800-285-1002 or via info@veggiesmadeeasy.com.

This recall taken from: http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm254904.htm

Consumers Warned to Avoid Eating Oysters rom Area 1642  in Apalachicola Bay, Florida

 

Warning follows bacterial illness outbreak

Fast Facts
• The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is advising consumers, restaurant operators, commercial shippers and processors of shellfish not to eat, serve, purchase, sell or ship oysters from Area 1642 in Apalachicola Bay, Fla. because the oysters may be contaminated with toxigenic Vibrio cholerae serogroup O75.

• Nine persons have been reported with illness. For eight, the illness was confirmed as caused by toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O75; laboratory confirmation is pending in the other person. No one was hospitalized or died.

• All ill persons reported consumption of raw or lightly steamed oysters.

• Traceback indicates that oysters harvested from Area 1642 in Apalachicola Bay, Fla., between March 21 and April 6, 2011, are associated with illness. 

• Those who have recently purchased oysters should check with the place of purchase and ask if they were harvested from the affected growing area.

What is the problem?
Raw oysters harvested from Area 1642 in Apalachicola Bay, Fla. between March 21 and April 6, 2011, have been linked to eight confirmed and one possible case of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O75 infection. The ill persons ate raw or lightly cooked oysters harvested from that area. Ill persons reside in Florida, Georgia, Louisiana and Indiana; all report consumption of oysters while in Florida.  There are several designated harvest areas within Apalachicola Bay, Fla, and each of these has a unique numerical identifier. Area 1642 is a zone that stretches from north to south in Apalachicola Bay just on the east side of the bridge that goes from Eastpoint, Fla., to St. George Island, Fla. The zone is approximately two miles wide from east to west.

This warning taken from:  http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm254754.htm

Donuts Recalled

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – May 10, 2011 – Bimbo Bakeries USA, Inc. is recalling the following Entenmann’s brand bagged Pop’Ems donuts and Bimbo brand 8 pack Donitas donuts sold in the following states because they may develop an uncharacteristic smell and become moldy within the product code:

Entenmann’s

Product Names
Sizes
States
UPC Codes
Powdered Pop’Ems Donuts 10 oz./284 grams AZ, CA, NV, UT 72030 01570
Cinnamon Pop’Ems Donuts 10 oz./284 grams AZ, CA, NV, UT 72030 01985
Rich Frosted Pop’Ems Donuts 10.5 oz./298 grams AZ, CA, NV, UT 72030 01571

Bimbo

Product Names
Sizes
States
UPC Codes
Sugared Donitas Donuts 8 count – 3.6 oz./102 grams AZ, CA, ID, NV, UT, WY 74323 07039
Powdered Donitas Donuts 8 count – 4.0 oz./113 grams AZ, CA, ID, NV, UT, WY 74323 04976
Chocolate Frosted Donitas Donuts 8 count – 4.3 oz./122 grams AZ, CA, ID, NV, UT, WY 74323 09964

The products were manufactured in the same facility.

The Entenmann’s products being recalled are in blue and white bags with the following dates which are printed on the top front of the bags:

  May 11, 12, 15, 18, 19, 22, 25, 26, 29, 2011
  June 1, 2, 6, 2011 

The Bimbo products being recalled are in cellophane wrappers with the same dates which are printed in a circle in the upper right of the package.

The company announced the recall after it received complaints of the unpleasant odor and temporary illness.  While the potential for serious health problems is low, some consumers are sensitive to the uncharacteristic off-smell and should not eat the recalled products because of possible temporary gastro-intestinal distress, including nausea and diarrhea. 

All products with the above code dates are being removed from store shelves in the affected states.  No other Entenmanns’s or Bimbo products or other states are affected.

Consumers who have purchased the product can return the product to its place of purchase for a full refund.  Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-800-984-0989 at any time 24 hours a day.

This recall taken from: http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm255026.htm

Salmonella in Paprika (Canada)

 

OTTAWA, May 11, 2011 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Alimentarus Import Export Inc. are warning the public and retailers not to sell, use or consume the Piment doux moulu (mild ground paprika) described below because the product may be contaminated with Salmonella.

The affected product, Dar Al Assala brand Piment doux moulu (mild ground paprika), imported from Morocco, was sold to various retail stores in Quebec as 5 kg bags bearing UPC 6 111242 541054, lot code PD17-F278 and best before date 05/10/2012.

This product is also known to have been sold from bulk. If you have purchased bulk paprika on or after November 12, 2010, and are unsure if you have the recalled product, check with your place of purchase to verify if it is subject to the recall.

This product is known to have been distributed in Quebec.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product.

Food contaminated with Salmonella may not look or smell spoiled.  Consumption of food contaminated with these bacteria may cause salmonellosis, a foodborne illness.  In young children, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems, salmonellosis may cause serious and sometimes deadly infections.  In otherwise healthy people, salmonellosis may cause short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, vomiting, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhoea.  Long-term complications may include severe arthritis.

The importer, Alimentaurus Import Export Inc. located in Montreal, QC is voluntarily recalling the affected products from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

For more information, consumers and industry can call CFIA at 1-800-442-2342 / TTY 1-800-465-7735 (8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday to Friday).

This recall taken from: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2011/20110511e.shtml

Listeria in Pork Loin (Canada)

 

OTTAWA, May 12, 2011 – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is warning the public not to consume the Fumagalli brand Pronta Fresca Lonza Stagionata (Seasoned Dry Cured Pork Loin) described below because the product may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

The affected product, Fumagalli brand Pronta Fresca Lonza Stagionata (Seasoned Dry Cured Pork Loin), imported from Italy, is sold in 100 g packages bearing UPC 8 002469 571352, Batch 119066 and Best Before 05/07/2011.

This product has been distributed in Quebec.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product.

Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with this bacteria may cause listeriosis, a foodborne illness. Listeriosis can cause high fever, severe headache, neck stiffness and nausea. Pregnant women, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems are particularly at risk. Infected pregnant women may experience only a mild, flu-like illness, however, infections during pregnancy can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn, or even stillbirth.

The Importer, Les Aliments Edesia Inc. located in Saint-Hubert, QC is voluntarily recalling the affected product from the marketplace. The CFIA is monitoring the effectiveness of the recall.

For more information, consumers and industry can call CFIA at 1-800-442-2342 / TTY 1-800-465-7735 (8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday to Friday).

This recall taken from: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2011/20110512be.shtml

Hepatitis A Outbreak in Snoqualmie Valley CA

 

SEATTLE–An outbreak of Hepatitis A in the Snoqualmie Valley has county health authorities asking people to get vaccinated.  Matias Valenzuela, public education coordinator with the county’s public health department, said his office has responded to six confirmed cases in the Valley, all in adults.  No word yet on the source of the outbreak. 

Hepatitis A is the only common vaccine-preventable foodborne disease in the United States (Fiore, 2004). It is one of five human hepatitis viruses that primarily infect the human liver and cause human illness. Unlike hepatitis B and C, hepatitis A doesn’t develop into chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis, which are both potentially fatal conditions; however, infection with the hepatitis A virus (HAV) can still lead to acute liver failure and death.

This article taken from: http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/snoqualmie-valley-hepatitis-a-outbreak/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+FoodPoisonBlog+%28Food+Poison+Blog%29

 STOP in the News: China Imports in the Grocery Store – A Cause for Concern

 

**STOP President Nancy Donley Quoted Below**

  

With Chinese products dominating more than just the shelves of dollar stores, it shouldn’t come as that much of a surprise — if you’re surprised at all — that imports from the largest nation in the world are increasingly finding their way into American grocery stores.

But the Chinese imports are starting to crop up in parts of the store that were more typically dominated by U.S. grown products or those from Central America. One such place is the freezer case, where imports are up 20 percent over the past decade and it is no longer unusual to find frozen vegetables that originated in China.

Even so, China still accounts for only seven percent of the overall market of frozen fruits and vegetable — up from two percent in 1999, notes Corey Henry, vice president of the American Frozen Food Institute,

“So, yes, imports from China have grown quite a bit, but still represent a small segment of the overall fruit and vegetable market,” Henry says. “China is the fourth largest foreign supplier of fruit and vegetables with Mexico, Canada and Chile the top three.”

But, if you shift away from frozen and fresh fruits and vegetables, where influence is growing but not yet commanding, you need not stray too far to see domination.

“I am concerned with just what regulatory program they have over there for food,” says Nancy Donley, president of STOP Foodborne Illness, a safe food advocacy group. “China has just always been one that raises concerns for us.”

Donley said the country has just said too many times that it is cleaning up its act: “‘We promise to never do it again until the next time’.”

The complete article can be viewed here:  http://blogs.reuters.com/prism-money/2011/05/11/china-imports-in-the-grocery-store-a-cause-for-concern/

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Waste not, save more: How to make every bite count

April 21, 2011

Rachel Zoe on Waste...at least that's what we think she'd say

 Waste not, save more. 

With the escalating prices of everyday life and a belt-tightening economy, everyone is more mindful of where their green is going. Yet, if you were to peek into your local landfill, you’d find almost 40% of it from fresh food – a waste of precious resources and a weight on the environment. 25% of our water and 4% of oil go into food that ends up in the trash, and it costs the U.S. $1B (with a B) dollars a year just to deal with disposal. To add to the pile, methane gas from food waste is 21x more harmful to the environment than car emissions.*

Give your fruit + veggies a wash before they chill.  We know, you’ve been trained to wait until you’re ready to use it.  But that’s because they’re talking about using water.  You, my friend, know better. Eat Cleaner Fruit + Vegetable Wash extends your shelf life and helps make your fruit and veggies ‘fast food’ because they’re ready to eat in a flash.  Clean it, dry it and store it.

 

Break bread with friends and family.  Nothing like gathering people you love around the table or sharing food with someone.  It not only brings you closer together, it helps avoid waste.  Swap nights where one cooks and the other cleans up and bring a little extra to work to share with your cohorts.  It’s amazing what a little food can do to break the ice, too!

Give it back to the earth. Collect that organic goodness and complete the life cycle.  Compost is one of the best way to feed your garden, flowers and herbs.   Most local waste management companies will even provide one to you at little or no cost.  For more info on becoming a safer, cleaner composter, click here for a how-to primer.

*Source:  Dept. of Agriculture, Science NOW.

How can you make every bite more earth wise?  Try these 6 on for size.

Avoid Take Out. According to cleanair.org, the US population tosses out paper bags & plastic cups, forks & spoons every year to circle the equator 300 times! That $.99 burrito may seem cheaper and more convenient in the short run but all that packaging – disposable trays, bags, cups and cutlery – has to go somewhere!

Make a list, shop for it once. Gas has gone through the roof! If you make a list, shop for your ingredients once, and plan your meals for the week, you can maximize your resources and time. Store them in reusable containers and take them to work and have plenty ready for the kids’ lunchboxes. Getting organized will save you time and after all, who has time to waste?

Shop seasonally. The further food has to travel, the longer the carbon footprint behind it. When it comes to fresh fruit and veggies, check to see if they’ve trekked around the globe before you buy them. The NRDC’s Simple Steps website is a good resource to find fresh produce in season depending on where you live and the time of year.

Meat-less. It’s estimated 1,800 to 2,500 gallons of water go into a single pound of beef compared to about 200 pounds of tofu. Cutting down on meat consumption just once a week can also reduce your risk of heart disease by almost 20, according to the Meatless Monday campaign. Check out our featured recipe below.

Go wild fish. When it comes to seafood, opt for wild and line caught varieties over farm raised, which can often be confined, medicated and fed dried food pellets made up of fish oil and fish meal (cannibal fish?). Plus,farm raised fish have been found to contain lower omega-3 levels and higher omega-6 fatty acid levels, a pro-inflammatory that you want to try and avoid.

Pay it forward. Supporting companies that use sustainable ingredients, processes and packaging while giving back to the environment and their local economies can continue to pay it forward with your purchase. Look for these practices on their packaging, social media and year end reports. Even if these products and services cost a little more, look at it as an investment into the future.

The Fit Foody…bringing you all the food that’s fit to eat.

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Protect Your Melons with Fruit + Veggies

October 8, 2010
Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables drastically reduces the risk of ever getting breast cancer and of having a recurrence. Scientists at the University of Hong Kong have just released more research findings adding to the growing pile of evidence that selections from the produce section are the best bet for keeping away this dreaded disease.

The association between vegetable and fruit intake and breast cancer risk was evaluated using a hospital-based, case-controlled study. Four hundred and thirty-eight breast cancer cases were matched with an equal number of controls by age and place of residency. Their dietary intake was assessed by face-to-face interviews using a food frequency questionnaire. Multivariate logistical regression was used to estimate odds ratios.

Total vegetable and fruit intake was found to be inversely associated with breast cancer risk. The odds ratios of the highest quartile relative to the lowest quartile of total vegetable and fruit intake were 0.28 and 0.53 respectively. This means that those eating the lowest amounts had a 47% increased risk of breast cancer. Consumption of individual vegetable and fruit groups such as dark green leafy vegetables, cruciferous vegetables, carrots, tomatoes, bananas, melons (watermelon, papaya, and cantaloupe) was inversely and significantly related to breast cancer risk. An inverse association was also observed for vitamin A, carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, and fiber intake. (International Journal of Cancer, July)

Fruits and vegetables modulate the cell cycle to safeguard health

People were created to eat fruits and vegetables. Several systems in the body depend on constituents from nature’s garden for proper functioning. One of these is the cell cycle that regulates the growth and maintenance of all living things. During the cell cycle, chromosomes are duplicated, and one copy of each duplicated chromosome is transferred from the mother cell to the daughter cell. Proper regulation of this cycle is critical for the normal development and maintenance of health in multi-cellular organisms. If the cell cycle is not working as it should, cancer and other degenerative diseases may be the result.

The successful reproduction of new cells depends on two critical processes, the replication of DNA, and mitosis (the nuclear division of the daughter cell from the mother cell). Compounds from fruits and vegetables stand guard over this process and assure successful completion. (Frontiers in Bioscience, January, 2008)

In a world in which more and more genotoxins are constantly bombarding people, a greater intake of fruits and vegetables is necessary to modulate the effects of deregulation at cell cycle checkpoints and keep the cycle running smoothly creating new cells that are healthy. Up to ten servings of fruits and vegetables each day are now recommended by some health gurus.

Fruits and vegetables can reduce breast cancer recurrence by 40 percent

Scientists from the University of California examined the relationship between plasma carotenoid concentration as a biomarker of fruit and vegetable intake and the risk for a new breast cancer event in 1,550 women previously treated for early stage breast cancer. After 5 years of follow-up, those women with the highest plasma carotenoid concentrations had a 40% reduced risk for breast cancer recurrence. (Journal of Clinical Oncology, September, 2005).

Carotenoids are natural fat-soluble pigments found in certain plants. They provide the bright red, orange, yellow, blue and purple colorations found in the vegetable kingdom. Famous members of this family include beta-carotene found in carrots, spinach, kale and cantaloupe; lycopene found in tomatoes, pink grapefruit, watermelon, papaya, and apricots; and lutein, found in dark green leafy vegetables and blueberries.

Since carotenoids need lipids to become bioactive in the body, salads full of these colorful vegetables should always be eaten with some type of fat. The liberal use of extra virgin olive oil on a salad is a great way to bring its carotenoids to life. Fruits and nuts is another tasty combination. The healthy fats found in the nuts will bring to life all the carotenoids in the fruits. Snacking on dried fruits and nuts satisfies the sweet tooth while loading up the body with carotenoids. For best digestion, eat the fruits first and then the nuts rather than eating them together.

Fruits and vegetables with the highest anti-cancer activity

Almost all fruits and vegetables have anti-cancer activity. The superstars of the research labs are garlic and onions, cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cabbage, kale, Brussels sprouts and greens), unbelliferous vegetables (carrots, celery, cilantro, parsley and parsnips), tomatoes, peppers, flax seeds, citrus, and soy. However, soy should never be eaten unless it is fermented in the traditional oriental manner and eaten as a small part of a mineral and protein rich meal.

Spirulina and chlorella are heavily pigmented microalgae. They are a nutrient rich vegetable food source rich in beta carotene and many other carotenoids, each with power to keep away breast cancer. They contain fatty acids to speed these carotenoids to work in the body.

Compounds from fruits and vegetables that have shown to help regulate the cell cycle include diindolymethane (DIM) from broccoli, apigenin from celery and parsley, curcumin from turmeric, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) from green tea, resveratrol from red grapes and peanuts, genistein from soybeans, and silymarin from milk thistle. These are widely available as supplements.

For more information:
http://www.naturalnews.com/025810.html
http://www.naturalnews.com/024958_f…
http://www.naturalnews.com/025441_v…

About the author

Barbara is a school psychologist, a published author in the area of personal finance, a breast cancer survivor using “alternative” treatments, a born existentialist, and a student of nature and all things natural.

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